Rob the teacher talks about using the present perfect to describe events and experiences.

 Watch the video and then do the tasks.

Task 1

Language Task

Rearrange the words into the correct order.

Exercise

Task 2

Language Task 2

Read the questions and select the right forms of the verbs.

Exercise

Task 3

Language Task 3

Choose the correct words to complete the sentences.

Exercise

Task 4

Language Task 4

Rearrange the words to make correct sentences.

Exercise

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hi there
In this video 1:01 - 1:14 the techer said if you don't know how to say something in English find another way to get your message across for example :
How do you say that in English ?
What do you call this in English?
In the first example he use "How" and the second example use "What". Why is that? Is it because of verb "say" so you use "How" question ?
I just know two ways to ask and both of them use " What" question like this :
What do you call this in English ?
What's this called in English?
Could you explain it to me, please? Thanks

Hello XuMinHa,

Yes, it's because of the different verbs: 'say' in the first question and 'call' in the second question. More specifically, the verb 'say' already has an object in that question -- the word 'that' is the object. 'how' is therefore used to speak about the manner in which you say something. 

In the other question, 'what' is the object of the verb 'call'. Both of the questions you already knew are correct.

Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I have ______ done well in exams, even when I haven’t studied for them!
My answer is wrong, because I answered by never.
I don't understand the sentences.(if I didin't study I have always done well in exams)
Thanks.

Hello Bkh73,

The correct answer here is 'always'. The reason for this is the word 'even', which shows that there must be some element of surprise or contrast in the sentence. For example:

I drive very carefully even when I am in a hurry.

Being in a hurry normally means people rush and are less careful, but this sentence tells us that despite being in a hurry I am still careful. Your example is similar: Despite not studying you still pass your exams.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi there! It is really difficult to understand the last Stephen's phrase. Did he say "Have you ever had a student better than me?". Is it right? If not, could you transcript it? Thank you

Hello Marcelo Touché,

That's correct! Well, he says 'Have you ever had a better student than me?' (slightly different word order). We're happy to help you understand short pieces from these videos with Rob -- just let us know what the time code is (e.g. 3:25-3:27) and we can help you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hey Kirk!
Thank you for replying it so fast.
Regards,
Marcelo

i have some trouble with distingush apart present perfect tense and past tense, sometimes i saw people use present perfect tense to express something in the past this've made me so confuse. Someone can explain it??,please

Hello ViPham,

This topic is explained in detail on our talking about the past page. Please take a look and then if you have any specific questions, please don't hesitate to ask us there.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi I'm Anna, I'm a new member.

I always get confused whit question like "What do you call this?" I would probably say "How do you call this?" or How is it call this things ? or How is this called in Eng ? instead What is this called in Eng?

Are these mistakes?

Thank you very much

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