Ashlie and Stephen take Tristan and his friend Jay Marie on a bus tour of London. Who is the better tour guide?

Instructions

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Task 1

Task 2

Task 3

We can use the infinitive with 'to':

  • after some verbs, e.g. 'Are you waiting to see me?'
  • after some adjectives, e.g. 'His accent is really difficult to understand.'
  • to give reasons for actions, e.g. 'We went to the shops to buy some dinner.'

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I might have some questions but id rather to thank the team for the hard tasks they are doing for learners for free. thanks all british council staffs.

Hello nicky62,

Thank you very much for your lovely comment! It's nice to know we're helping people!

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

When I visit a city for the first time, I like to see the main places and monuments, talk with foreign people, or try to talk and understand them.
I go to restaurants and shops.
I think American accent is usually more understandable than others. Australian accent needs some getting use to. British from London is ok. My accent is an awful french accent but I'm trying to get better.

I like to see the places more famous commented for population to city. In truth, I thing difficult to understand the Irish accents.

When I visit a city for the first time I like to go around for a scenic tour, so as to have a total view of the city.
As for the second question, I don't know.

Hi teacher,
I have a question about the difference between express "It should be here in any minute now"and "It should be here any minute now", is it because here with the word "now" so we don't need to add"in"?

Sophy

Hello Sophy622,

I'd never thought of it that way, but what you say makes sense. In the end, people say what they say because it's the way other people speak, so there's not always a very satisfactory reason for some expressions.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Must we say "fully of people" or "full of people" ? What's the difference ?
Thanks

Hello STEPHANE ROTH,

The correct form here is 'full of people', which means that there were many people in a given place: the square was full of people.

'Fully of people' is grammatically possible but it would have the meaning 'completely of people'. It's hard to think of a context in which it would make sense. Perhaps something like: The success of our company is fully [the result of the] people who work in it.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you

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