Rob and Stephen enjoy talking about grammar, so stop to watch them discuss verbs followed by gerunds, v-ing, and infinitives, to + verb, as well as chat about too and very.

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This is not an easy one. I can't understand when I've to put the gerund and when not, I hope to learn this argument as soon as possible, I'd better go reading.

Hello, Dear Team.
Help me solve this problem, please.
1. 'Help' is one of some verbs are followed by the to-infinitive.
For example : " I'll help you to finish it".
2. 'Help' is one of any verbs are followed by the bare infinitive (without 'to').
For example : " Help me carry my shoes".
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So when I have to decide to use a verb 'Help' with the first explanation and the second explanation above?
Would you like to explain, please?
Thank you in advance.

Hello Nizam Balinese,

Some verbs can be used in more than one way and 'help' is one of these. Both the infinitive without to and the infinitive with to are correct after 'help':

I helped him carry the bag.

I helped him to carry the bag.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello dear team,

I saw in dictionary, the -ing form of 'Managing' or 'Leading' is used as adjective. can it be used as noun when I put in front of sentence like 'Managing 100 people is mandatory' or 'Leading the students in history discussion is the interesting activity'?

Hello Lianop,

Yes, that is correct. The -ing form of a verb has many uses, and one of them is 'nominalise' (turn into a noun) a verb -- this is also commonly called a 'gerund'. In both of your example sentences, 'managing' and 'leading' are nouns.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk

I have a question with this sentence:

1.You use it for taking videos.

Is “taking” a gerund and “videos” the object of the gerund?

Thank you,
Alyson

Hello Alyson,

Yes, your analysis is correct. Prepositions (such as 'for') take gerunds after them.

I'm afraid, however, that 'take' doesn't collocate with 'videos'. While we 'take' pictures, we 'make' (or 'shoot') videos.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

I thank you again for all of your help. I have another sentence that I wanted to get clarification:

1. What are those figures based on?
2. Those figures are based on ...

1. Why do we have to use the past for base (based) if we are using "are".
2. Are question 1 and sentence 2 mentioned above present simple question and sentence?

Thank you for your help.

Best wishes
Alyson

Hello Alyson,

Yes, those sentences are in the present simple. 'based' is not a past form here, but rather a past participle, which here functions as an adjective, not as a verb.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk

Sorry I still have a question about this. Why use "based" past participle in the sentence

1. What are those figures based on?
2. Are you married?"

Instead of using:

1. What are those figures base on?
2. Are you marry?"

Thank you for more clarification.

Best wishes
Alyson

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