The 13 Genre Families that the BAWE research identified are grouped  here according to their Primary Purpose:

Demonstrating Knowledge and Understanding

  • Exercise genres give you the opportunities to demonstrate your understanding, usually of basic skills and concepts. They are typically short numbered responses to questions. Exercises can be given as a writing task in any discipline, and are common in disciplines where students are required to perform mathematical calculations.
  • In Explanations, you are required to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding and to answer questions. They are generally longer than exercises and additionally expect you to explain how something works or functions. Explanations can be given as a writing task in any discipline, but are particularly common in the sciences.

Developing Powers of Independent Reasoning

  • In Critiques, you will be expected to evaluate something such as a theory, a book or a piece of equipment. This will enable you to answer the question, "What is the value of x?" Critiques are common across the disciplines, to evaluate the writer’s own work, and the work of others.
  • In Essays, you are expected to develop ideas, make connections between arguments and evidence and develop an individualised thesis. You will usually write these in response to a question given by your lecturer. Essays can be given as a writing task in any discipline.

Building Research Skills

  • For a Literature Survey, you have to read what other people have written on a given topic and present evidence of your reading. This could be in the form of an annotated bibliography, an anthology or a literature review chapter. Literature Surveys can be given as a writing task in any discipline.
  • A Methodology Recount will expect you to present an account of the procedures you followed and your findings from an experimental study. A typical example is a laboratory report. Methodology Recounts are particularly common in disciplines where experimental work is undertaken, such as biological science, engineering, food science, physics and psychology.
  • Research Reports are generally the longest assignments you will write and are designed to demonstrate your ability to conduct a complete piece of research. An example is a final-year project or dissertation. Research Reports can be given as a writing task in any discipline, particularly in the later stages of a programme of study.

Preparing for Professional Practice

  • In a Case Study, you focus on a particular organisation, industry or person (such as a patient) in order to describe it from a range of perspectives. You will conclude with recommendations for future action. Case Studies are particularly common in medicine and health disciplines, and in disciplines which involve business studies (for example agriculture, business, engineering, and hospitality, leisure and tourism).
  • In Design Specifications, you are expected to demonstrate your ability to develop a design for a product or procedure that could be manufactured or implemented. Design Specifications are particularly common in computer science and engineering.
  • In Problem Questions, a situation is described and you will have to analyse it from a professional perspective and reach a conclusion. Problem Questions are particularly common in law and in disciplines where legal issues are discussed.
  • The purpose of a Proposal is for you to demonstrate your ability to make a plan for future action. This must be detailed and realistic. Proposals can be given as a writing task in any discipline, to plan for research or professional practice.

Writing for Oneself and Others

  • In Public Engagement, you will communicate your specialist disciplinary knowledge in forms such as newspaper articles or information leaflets. You will be expected to write in registers suitable for general rather than academic audiences. Public Engagement is particularly common in the sciences, but can be given as a writing task in any discipline.
  • Event Recounts include personal accounts of your learning, such as a literature search or team work, and chronological reports on events such as accidents or disease outbreaks. You may be expected to assume a personal and reflective angle. Event Recounts are particularly common in creative disciplines where students write about the behaviour of others or their own creative process, and in the applied disciplines such as business, education and health where students reflect on their professional practice.

In Tasks 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, you can spend more time familiarising yourself with the Genre Families and how they are classified.


The purpose of these exercises is to familiarise you with the five Primary Purposes of academic writing and the 13 Genre Families associated with these Primary Purposes. This should help you to select the most appropriate Genre Family for your writing task.

Further sections of this site will help you to write these texts, but the present purpose is simply to familiarise you with these Genres Families.

Task 1

Demonstrating Knowledge and Understanding

Drag the correct Genre Family to complete the definition within the Demonstrating Knowledge and Understanding category.

Exercise

Task 2

Building Research Skills

Drag the correct Genre Family to complete the definition within the Building Research Skills category.

Exercise

Task 3

Developing Powers of Independent Reasoning

Drag the correct Genre Family to complete the definition within the Developing Powers of Independent Reasoning category.

Exercise

Task 4

Writing for Oneself and Others

Drag the correct Genre Family to complete the definition within the Writing for Oneself and Others category

Exercise

Task 5

Preparing for Professional Practice

Drag the correct Genre Family to complete the definition within the Preparing for Professional Practice category.

Exercise

Comments

Dear Sir
Thank you very much for your explanation about the 'THESIS' I understood it well. I will go through the website you have mentioned.
Thanks again
Regards
Andrew international

Dear Sir
The word 'thesis' means in an essay is what you write through out essay. It is common to the whole essay. I am I correct or wrong? In the introductory (the first paragraph) paragraph normally the topic sentence comes first so where do you write the thesis.
Please let me know.
Thank you.
Regards
Andrew international

Hello Andrew international,

The thesis of an essay is a statement - usually one sentence, though sometimes more - that encapsulates the original thinking presented in the essay. It typically comes somewhere in the first paragraph, though it's not usually the first sentence, and it can come in other places.

One of the best resources I know of on thesis statements is this page at the University of North Carolina's Writing Center. It's worth taking the time to read through the page thoroughly.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team