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Adverbials of time

Level: beginner

We use adverbials of time to describe:

  • when something happens:

I saw Mary yesterday.
She was born in 1978.
I will see you later.
There was a storm during the night.

We waited all day.
They have lived here since 2004.
We will be on holiday from 1 July until 3 August.

They usually watched television in the evening.
We sometimes went to work by car.

Adverbials of time

Grouping_MTU3MTU

 

Comments

Hello!

May I know which is correct:

"I don't feel well this morning."
"I've not been well since this morning."
"I've not been feeling well since this morning."
"I've not felt well since this morning."
"I'm not feeling well this morning."
"I didn't feel well this morning."

It's a little confusing. Which is both grammatically correct and naturally spoken?

Thank you!

Hello Timmy Ferrer,

All of the sentences are grammatically correct. Some of them are simply alternatives in this context, but there are differences between some.

 

I don't feel well this morning.

The speaker still doesn't feel well and it is still morning.

I'm not feeling well this morning.

This has a similar meaning to the first sentence. It is a more colloquial/informal way to phrase it, but it is quite common in some dialects.

 

I've not been well since this morning.

I've not been feeling well since this morning.

I've not felt well since this morning.

All of these have essentially the same meaning. The speaker still does not feel well and it is no longer morning.



I didn't feel well this morning.

The speaker now feels well but did not feel well earlier. It is no longer morning.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for your this! However, if we're taking language proficiency tests such as TOEIC, IELTS, TOEFL, and the like, which is usually considered or used?

My colleagues and I were talking about this since a question was posted by a Japanese teacher of English. They have this EIKEN, similar to the above-mentioned tests, which they are also preparing their students for.

Looking forward to your guidance.

Thank you very much!!

Hello again.

Where there are alternatives with similar meanings, it's really a question of style. Certain forms might be more appropriate in a less formal context - the two continuous forms here, but none of them examples you provided are slang or exclusively used in speech.

You would not be penalised for using any of the forms in a written or even formal context, particularly given that in a piece of writing or speech the chosen form is the only one present, and there are not three alternatives to provide a contrast. Using contractions in a formal piece of writing would be a worse slip in terms of style than choosing any of these examples, for example.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
May I know what's different beetween Adverbials and Adverbs, for example "Always" is an adverb or adverbial?

Thank you,
Azadeh

Hi Azadeh,

Adverbs are individual words. Adverbial is a broader term and includes individual words and also phrases.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
It used to be the case that when/if/whenever someone mentioned Arizona, I thought about her.
It used to be the case that when/if/whenever someone mentioned Arizona, I would think about her.
It used to be the case that when/if/whenever someone mentioned Arizona, I used to think about her.
Do the 3 sentences mean the same thing? Also, are when/if/whenever interchangeable in those sentences?
Thank you.

Hello sam61,
There is no difference in meaning here between the three verb forms (thought, would think and used to think). In this context, all of them describe a regular (not unique) action.
~
'Whenever' usually means 'every time' rather than describing a particular time, while 'when' has a broader range of meanings. In this context, however, they are interchangeable.
'If' is a little different. It carries a sense of uncertainty. 'When' ('whenever') tells us that the action will happen even if the time is uncertain. 'If' tells us that the action may not happen.
~
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!

I have a question about "during" and when we have to use the article "the".

If I'm referring to any night and not a specific one, which is correct, "during the night" or "during night"?

Here's an example: "If you take a walk during (the) night, be very careful."

Thank you!

Hello Anda B,

'during the night' is correct and 'during night' is not – there is no good reason as far as I know, it's just that people say the first one but not the second.

Actually, many people would probably say 'at night' instead of 'during the night' because 'during the night' could imply the whole period of the night, which doesn't seem to be what you mean here.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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