Level: beginner

this and these

We use this (singular) and these (plural) as pronouns:

  • to talk about people or things near us:

This is a nice cup of tea.
Whose shoes are these?

  • to introduce people:

This is Janet.
These are my friends John and Michael.

Be careful!

We say, This is John and this is Michael. (NOT These are John and Michael.)

  • to begin a conversation on the phone:

Hello, this is David. Can I speak to Sally?

that and those

We use that (singular) and those (plural) as pronouns to talk about things that are not near us:

What's that?
Those are very expensive shoes.
This is our house, and that's Rebecca's house over there.

Demonstratives

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We also use that to reply to something someone has said:

'Shall we go to the cinema?'  'Yes, that’s a good idea.'
'I've got a new job.'  'That's great.'
'I'm very tired.'  'Why is that?'

Replies with that's 1

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Replies with that's 2

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With nouns

We can also use this, these, that and those with nouns. We use this and these for people or things near us:

We have lived in this house for twenty years.
Have you read all of these books?

and that and those for people or things that are not near us:

Who lives in that house?
Who are those people?

Demonstratives with nouns

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Comments

Hello IraR,

It's hard for me to comment without actually seeing the chart itself, as I don't see the thing which you are describing. However, I think we would formulate the sentence differently and say something like this:

The chart shows that the category with the most minutes was 'Local', with 70 billion minutes spoken in 1995.

There are quite a few errors in your sentences. I think it would be helpful for you to have a teacher work through them with you. If you do not have a teacher then you can find out about IELTS courses at the British Council on our page for your country: https://www.britishcouncil.ru/ 

Please also visit, if you have not already, our site for IELTS candidates: TakeIELTS. You'll find tips, suggestions, practice materials, mock exam papers and sample answers there to help you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello.
I can't understand the difference between:

We use it to talk about ourselves:
• on the telephone: Hello. It’s George.

We use this (singular) and these (plural) as pronouns:
to introduce ourselves to begin a conversation on the phone: Hello, this is David, Can I speak to Sally?

Can you help me, please.
Thanks

Hello Tanya.ru,

We can begin a conversation in either way but there is a slight difference. If I know the person very well then 'It's George' is more likely. We begin in this way when we are speaking to someone who we know well and speak to often, so that the call is not completely unexpected.

'This is George' would be used when the other person knows you but does not necessarily expect a call, or might be surprised by the call.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Wedded wife. I looked for in the dictionary and these have the same meaning. Can´t we say only wife?

Ok. Thank you, Kirk!

Hello simonenmourao,

Yes, 'wedded wife' is pretty unusual -- 'wife' is much more common and more appropriate for most contexts.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

oh, I finish all the sentences.
That's great !

Sir, I'm sorry to post it here but I did not really find How to post it on comparing and contrasting-modifying comprative page. please turn that on. Sir, I say to my brother " The harder you work The earlier you will get success". could I also say that You will get success as earlier as you work harder or as earlier as harder you work. One last question, you will remember me as much as you forget me or The more you forget the more you remember what should I say ?

Hello SonuKumar,

The alternatives to the 'the' + comparative + 'the' + comparative construction that you ask about are not grammatically correct. 'You will remember me as much as you forget me' and 'The more you forget the more you remember are grammatically correct, though.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir what is the full form that's what ? is it that is what or that was what ? if both please explain and when do we use this is what rather than that is what?

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