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Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. We often use them to avoid repeating the nouns that they refer to. Pronouns have different forms for the different ways we use them. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how pronouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Comments

I have a problem with negation .
Do we say : he isn't a fool or he is no fool ?
It's no secret that..or its not a secret that ..?
What's the difference ? When to use each ?

Hello uchiha itache,

Both forms are correct. The only difference is that the form with 'no' is rather stronger in a rhetorical sense, I would say.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Surely we often use the present simple for habits . but what about the future simple with ( will ) I read it can also be used to describe habits . so what's the diffrrence ?

Hello uchiha itache,

We use the present simple to describe habitual behaviour, as you say. 'Will' can be used to describe the behaviour which we expect. It is a form of prediction about the present. For example:

He goes to the shop every morning. [habitual behaviour]

He'll go to the shop every morning. [this is what I expect based on what I know]

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks a lot

Sir,
As you said, "He goes to the shop every
morning, shows habitual behaviour."
and "He will go to the shop every morning,
shows this is what I expect based on what I
know."

Then I think the same applies for the situation
below.
He went to the shop every morning. (Habitual
action)
He would go to the shop every morning. (This is
what I expect based on what I know) Right ?

Hi SonuKumar,

Both of your sentences refer to habitual past actions. 'would' isn't used to refer to past expected actions but rather for past repeated actions. You can read more about this use of 'would' on our Past habits page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi SonuKumar,

As far as I am aware, there is no way to indicate this grammatically in English. But you could say something like 'As far as I know, he went to the shop every morning' or 'I didn't see him do it every day, but I believe he went to the shop every morning.' If you didn't see it yourself but someone else told you, the word 'apparently' is a good way to indicate this: 'Apparently, he went to the shop every morning.'

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!
I am so confused whether I have to use above or over JUST to say in a higher postition . please explain it . and do we really use above for things on the same flat plane? And If so, why don't we use over? Cause it means directly above .
Please tell me when they're interchangeable and give exactly the same meaning and when they aren't .

Hi uchiha itache,

In general, 'above' is used to speak about a higher level, though it's important to know what specific context or contexts you have in mind.

I don't see how one object could be 'above' or 'over' another if they are both on the same flat plane – could you give a specific example? The proximity of one object to the other is also an important factor.

In any case, I'd recommend look at this Cambridge Dictionary entry on just this question. If you have any further questions, you're welcome to ask them but please provide a specific sentence in context.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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