Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

still and no longer 1

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still and no longer 2

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already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

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Comments

Hello Agnes,

It sounds like you've understood 'yet' here. I'd re-write it as '... has not yet realised'. See the dictionary entry for 'yet', near the bottom, where you'll 'have yet to'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,
Actually I based on the structure of "have to be/ be to be" though there are some differences in their meaning, so I automatically thought the negative form of "have yet to" as I asked.
But "have yet to" and "be yet to" have the same meaning, haven't they?
E.g She was not yet sure if she could trust him.
Can it be "She was yet sure if she could trust him."?
Many thanks!

Hello Agnes,

'have yet to' and 'be yet to' can both be used (look under Have yet to and be yet to) but please note that a verb in the base form follows them. Your first example is grammatical (because it makes a normal use, with negation, of 'yet'), but the second one (which attempts to use 'be yet to', but incorrectly since only a base form of a verb can follow it) is not. Please also note that both of these forms are really quite formal.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,
So if my first example is rewritten: ".....has not yet to realize"? - Is its meaning equivalent with "has realized"?

'have yet to' and 'be yet to' are categorized in the same expressing as Cambridge dictionaries reference.
Can you explain the difference of meaning for the same context that are substituted either 'have yet to' or 'be yet to' as follows
The President and her husband are yet to arrive. (The President and her husband will arrive.)
The President and her husband have yet to arrive. (?)

Many thanks!

Hello Agnes,

No, neither 'have yet to' nor 'be yet to' are used with 'not', so the sentence you ask about is not correct.

Both 'The President and her husband have yet to arrive' and the same sentence with 'are yet to' mean 'They haven't arrived yet'. As you can see, they are basically equivalent to the present perfect in the negative, and imply that the action is expected. As far as I know 'have yet to' is more common (though not very common, as both forms are really quite formal) than 'is/are yet to' and they mean the same thing.

If you want to know more about them, please consult a corpus such as the NOW Corpus. For example, write 'have yet to' in the search box, press the 'Find matching strings' button, then press the 'HAVE YET TO' on the next page and you'll see thousands examples of how it's used. You can do the same with 'are yet to' or any other word or phrase you'd like to understand better.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

Thank you for your kind support.

Very interesting about "NOW Corpus"!

However, I'd like to reconfirm what you mean about 'have yet to' / 'be yet to' whether both of them can not be used with "not".
If so, within neither/nor pattern, let's say neither 'have yet to' nor 'be yet to' IS used with 'not'. Is that correct?

Many thanks!

Hello Agnes,

As far as I can think, 'have not yet to' and 'is not yet to' are not used. That's right: neither 'have yet to' nor 'be yet to' are used with 'not'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

Well take noted!
However can you explain for me why you used "are" in this context as I used to know that when nor or or is used the subject closer to the verb determines the number of the verb?
Many thanks!

Hello Agnes,

Traditionally, 'neither A nor B' is followed by a singular verb, but in an informal style people often use a plural verb. I wasn't even thinking about it when I wrote my response, and used an informal style. But you could also use 'is' instead of 'are' in my sentence and it would be fine.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

already, still, yet and no longer...

Where is the last one?... Seems to be no longer here :)

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