Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

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already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

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Comments

I've got the same question that ehernandez07, Why does in the question "Have you finished that book already?" is "already" instead "Yet"? Because in the text of the page says "We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually ".

Greetings.

Hello adeljva,

Both 'already' and 'yet' are possible here but there is a difference in the implication of the question. If you use 'already' then you are expressing surprise that the book has been finished so quickly. If you use 'yet' then you are simply asking or, depending on your tone of voice, you might even be asking in a slightly impatient manner.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

i have a question: "you still not face the strongest one yet" - is it correct or not?

Hello kaustavg,

The sentence is not correct. When we use 'yet' in this kind of context it is generally with the present perfect, so the correct sentence would probably be 'You have still not faced the strongest one yet'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thanks for advice. i was confused. another question- "you have not face the strongest one yet" is it correct ?

Hello kaustavg,

No, that is not correct either. To make a present perfect form you need to use the past participle ('faced') not the base form ('face').

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi! Can you tell me if my grammar is correct ----- "Yet, the eagle was still blamed."

Hello Cyrell,

The grammar of the sentence is indeed correct. I must admit I'm a bit intrigued!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Would u pls advise if it is wrong or correct that I saw a clause on the newspaper "Whatsapp blocked yet again in Brazil after legal dispute.

Hello david671023,

That sentence would need a few small changes to be completely correct:

Whatsapp has been blocked yet again in Brazil after a legal dispute

However, in newspaper headlines certain words are often omitted, such as articles and auxiliary verbs. Therefore, in the context of a newspaper headline the sentence would be fine; if you were using it elsewhere then it would be changed as above.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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