Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

still and no longer 1

GapFillTyping_MTU3NzQ=

still and no longer 2

GapFillTyping_MTU3NzU=

already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

already and yet

GapFillDragAndDrop_MTU3NzY=

Comments

" A medical student lost in a brutal world of stupid systems, yet finds solace in his books" it's like an autobiography a short one written on a twitter account

Thank u again :)

What is correct for a book that i half read ?
Yet to be completed OR
Yet to complete

Hello Dr Dreamer,

I'd say 'yet to be completed'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, sir.

I have come to find your homepage while I was studying the usage 'already and yet'.
according to your site, there is an explanation about this grammar usage.

Have you finished the work already?

Have you finished the work yet?

Someone who is a English native speaker has said to me that there is no difference between the two sentences above in real English.
But I don't know why but I have had to keep questioning about this matter.
I think there must be some difference between the two above.
Now here are my questions.

1) Is it true that there is no difference between the sentences above in real English?

2) If there is a crystal-clearly difference between the two in real English, what is the difference?

Thank you in advance.

Hello Paul Cho,

In your example sentences, 'already' suggests that it is earlier than expected; it means something like 'so quickly'.

'Yet' can be neutral or can be slightly critical, suggesting that it is taking longer than it should.

We generally use 'yet' in negative sentences and questions rather than in affirmative sentences.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you for your reply.
But I want to get it straight.
According to your comment, in English-speaking countries, these two sentences are clearly different, right? Thank you in advance.

Hello Paul Cho,

As I said in the previous reply, the difference between the sentences is the connotation. Both sentences ask about the same situation, but while one ('already') is used for something quicker than expected, the other ('yet') is used with a more neutral meaning.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

could we use (yet) in one sentence which is negative and question at the same time. like :
Haven't you finished yet?
is it correct ?

Hello korejar,

Yes, that is perfectly fine.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello your teachings are quite helpful. thank you a lot. i am quite confused with the phrases "it's time" and "it's high time" someone told me that the first one is for past tenses and i'm trying to understand but i cannot perfectly understand how they can be used. May please you please explain

Pages