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'still' and 'no longer', 'already' and 'yet'

Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

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already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

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Comments

Hi, What does the sentence mean "Malaysian plane yet to be found"? Does it mean the plane haven't found? If so, then why did they not use any negative words with yet? I've also read a newspaper title like "The result yet to be published''. Thanks in advance.

 

Hi Shikkharthi,

In any language there are alternative ways of saying things. As you suggest, 'yet to be + past participle' means the same as 'has not yet been + past participle':

The plane has yet to be found.

The plane has not yet been found.

The difference is really a question of style: 'yet to be' is a more formal way to phrase this. It is quite common in official language, such as from governments, authorities and also newspapers.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,

I would like to know why did you used "hadn't" and not "haven't" in site example:

"It was late, but they hadn’t arrived yet"

In my study material they used:

"They haven't arrived yet"

Thank you and best regards,

Mario

Hello Mario,

The time in these two sentences is different. In 'They haven't arrived yet', someone is speaking about now. E.g. you and I are waiting for Tess and Ravi, and they are late. We could say this sentence to comment on this.

'It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet' is referring to a time in the past ('it was late'), not to now. To refer to a time before another past time, we typically use the past perfect. Please take a look at our past perfect and talking about the past pages for more on this.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir,
If have been troubled by two sentences mentioned above. Please help here.

Firstly, is the speaker talking about a past event here: "It was late, but they hadn’t arrived yet."
Secondly, please clarify what the speaker meant in this sentence: "She won’t have sent the email yet."
Thank you!

Hello adtyagrwl1,

'Yet' means 'not (so far) at this time', but 'this time' can be a time in the present or the past; in the example you quote the time reference is past and it means they hadn't arrived at the moment of speaking (i.e. a past moment).

Your second sentence uses 'will' for prediction about the present. When we make a guess about the present we can use will. For example:

Where's Tom?

He's not home yet. He'll be stuck in a traffic jam, I expect.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you Admin:
I have finished all the lessons, exercises related to "already.still,yet and no longer" but I have never find a lesson or an exercise discussed "no longer.....could you please show or describe it?

Hello Abomohab,

'no longer' is an adverbial that is used to express that an action or state has ended. It is usually used before the verb, e.g. 'I no longer work there' (here the main verb is 'work'). It's also possible to use a negative verb and 'any longer', e.g. 'I don't work there any longer'.

We're in the process of revising the Grammar Reference, and the new page is to include this information - thanks for your feedback.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi,
It's very hard to choose which one is suitable 'just or already'.

Just, yet, still, already

Question 3/5

I've (already)/(just) seen this film. Let's watch something else.

Hi reol,

Really, both 'already' and 'just' are possible here, though 'already' is probably more common. With 'already', it means that you have seen the film before, at some unspecified time in the past. With 'just', it means that you have seen the film in the recent past, perhaps even just as recently as the same day. That seems unlikely in most context - this is why I suppose 'already' is the answer whoever wrote this question had in mind.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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