The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello agie,

We would actually say 'in my experience'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct:
1.Best Regards or Best regards?
English Lesson/s or English lesson/s?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

When ending a letter or an email, only the first word is capitalised:

Best regards / Yours faithfully / All the best / Take care / Best wishes etc.

 

Unless there is some other reason (such as being part of a title) we only capitalise the country name, including derivatives such as adjectives. Thus 'English lesson' is correct.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello dear Peter,
Thank you for the help. Thanks a lot.
I am confused about the following sentence, is it true, I mean grammatically? Is this second conditional?
(Tom might be disappointed if he did not have a ticket for tonight's concert)
Thank you.

Hello Hosseinpour,

It is possible to use 'might' in place of 'would' in the result clause of a hypothetical construction. 'Would' suggests certainty, while 'might' means that we are not sure.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir
Thank you very much for your prompt reply regarding 'Neither of those sentences are correct.'
Regards
Lal

Hello dear team,
If you (are/be) free tonight, we might go out for a drink, or to the cinema. Why (be) is not the answer.
Tom might be disappointed if he did not have a ticket for tonight's concert. If this sentence is true could you please explain (the relation between (might------ did not have to).
Thank you

Hello Hosseinpour,

Modal verbs such as 'might' are followed by the bare infinitive, so we say 'might be'. In the sentence you quote, however, we have no modal verb and so we use 'be' in its normal present form ('If you are...').

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct:
I am glad you enjoyed the film OR I am glad that you enjoyed the film?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

Both sentences are correct. In sentences like this you can omit 'that' with no change in the meaning.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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