The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Thanks Peter M

"Both John and Hary sang well."

Is this a compound sentence, and why? How to identify a compound sentence?

Regards

Thank you very much.

Hello
I would like to ask if the following is correct
If we want to consentrate in order to study can we also say, I have to find a way to focus?
2.For a place, area, city etc can we say this place has a good plan or bad vibe or good or bad vibes?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,
We usually say we need to focus when something is distracting us rather than simply when we want to concentrate, but it could be used more generally.
A place can have a good vibe, meaning a good atmosphere. This is a very informal phrase (slang) and a little old-fashioned.
~
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Thank you for your reply. Is it polite to say so?
Is there a new way to say a place has a good vibe?
Thank you

Hello agie
You could say what Peter said, e.g. 'There's a nice atmosphere in this place' or 'You'll feel at home (or 'relaxed') in this place. It kind of depends on the place and what exactly you want to say.
All the best
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
Look at the sentence please.
The hotel is in the heart or center of the city Connaught Place.
In this sentence, does the place refer to the city or the center of the hotel, though I know the center is Connaught Place and the city is Delhi, but I'm asking grammatically for one who doesn't know about the city or its center ?

And Can I use 'At' instead of 'In' in the sentence ?

The last question is, is it worng to start a sentence with words like 'And' or 'But' ?

Hello SonuKumar,
We're happy to comment on our own materials but I'm afraid we can't do detailed sentence analysis on random sentences from unknown sources, particularly when they do not appear to be fully grammatical.
~
Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi
Is it ok to say "today morning" to mean in the morning today, just as we say "tomorrow morning" or "yesterday evening"?

Thanks.

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