The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct
When we describe something that happened in the past we can say
I was very happy to see her
BUT can we also say
I was happy to saw her?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie

Could you please ask this comment on a more appropriate page? I appreciate that it's not always easy to find a page, but, for example, the to + infinitive page in our Verbs section is a much more useful place.

Thanks in advance

Best wishes

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct
When someone calls us and we don't know who is it we ask:
Who is this?
and who are you?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

You can use those forms but they are very direct and not very polite. A person might use them when they are irritated for some reason. More polite forms would be these:

Who's calling, please?

Who am I speaking to, please?

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following sentences are correct:
Anyone who does not use Social media nowadays is behind times and needs to catch up
1. Is it a polite way to say something like this?
2.is it Social media or the Social media?
3.is it ok anyone or someone?

b. You must practice every day not once in a blue moon
1. Is it polite to use this idiom, in this case?
2. once in a blue moon or every blue moon?
Thank you in advance

Hello,
I would like to know which of the following is correct:
When we meet someone for the first time, we create or form an opinion about him/her?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie

I'd say 'form' is the better choice here.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

I would like to know if the following is correct.i dont have a car so i would have a car.

Hi Duzkoy

The sentence is a little awkward, but since I don't know what you want to communicate I'm afraid it's difficult to suggest an alternative. Perhaps 'I don't have a car but I would like to have one'?

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk and Peter
I wish both of you a happy new year.
Lal

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