The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to know about the following
Knowledge is a noun and doesn't have plural.
Is there any way that we use plural?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

Knowledge is an uncountable noun. The only way to use it as a plural would be if you had a very strange context which would establish knowledge as something which could be counted. You might invent such a context for a speculative science-fiction story, for example. Sometimes in academic work (psychology, cultural studies etc) a word which is usually uncountable is used in a countable way as a way to develop an argument or claim, but these are all specialised and non-standard uses.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Choose
1-Andy (lived-has lived-was living)in Canada for five years only.
2- There is a lot of traffic.We (must- might)be late.

Hello Hamdy Ali,

In 1, all three answers are possible, depending on the context. If I had to choose one, I'd choose either 'lived' or 'has lived'. I'd encourage you to ask your teacher about this.

In 2, 'might' makes more sense.

Please note that if this is homework, you should do it yourself. If you want to suggest answers to us, explaining why you think they are correct, and then ask if they are correct, we're happy to help.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask what is the difference between
I live in Italy and
I am living in Italy.
When do we use the first option and when do we use the second one.
Thank you in advance

Hi agie

The difference between the present simple and present continuous tenses is explained in detail on our talking about the present page. Please see it for more information. If you have any other questions about it, please feel free to ask us there.

All the best
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for your reply. In the specific following case, which is better to use:
Example: I always lived in Italy but now I live or I am living for 3 years in France
Can temporary, in this case, be 2-3 years or it is better to use Simple Present?
Thank you in advance

Hello,
I would like to know which of the following is correct:
When we read a book and we want to write something from the book we
Keep notes or take notes?
When someone reads something to use and we have to write it, we
keep or take notes?
Thank you in advance

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