The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello agie,

First of all, I think we would say '...work on the basics' rather than 'in'.

'...work on the basics of... in order to make progress in...' (not 'a progress') is fine.

'...work on the fundamentals of... in order to make progress in...' (not 'a progress') is fine.

Using both terms ('...basics and fundamentals of...') is grammatically fine but is rather repetitive, as the terms have very similar meanings. I would suggest using one or ther other, stylistically speaking.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi agie,

I'd say work on the fundamentals, but otherwise that's fine in the context of both academic and sports. 'basics and fundamentals' strikes me as redundant.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask the following;
If someone fails in a test or face a job /health problem. So after a challenge or a failure can we use the following expression/sentence.
After that he/she tries to balance back
Thanks in advance

Hi agie,

I've never heard the expression 'balance back', but 'bounce back' is very commonly used to express this idea. After reading the dictionary entry (which I linked to), please let us know if that doesn't sound right.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Kirk,
Hello and thank you for the help, thanks a lot.

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct:
1.I like blue color or I like the blue color?
2. I like the blue color, you may like orange, he/she may like green.

What is beautiful for anyone is different. Is this expression correct?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

I'm afraid neither of the sentences in 1 is idiomatic; normally, people say 'I like blue' or 'I like the colour blue'. 2 sounds strange to me because of the modal verb 'may', but if you change 'the blue colour' to 'the colour blue', otherwise it is correct.

I'm afraid I don't understand the last sentence you ask about. It makes me think of the traditional saying 'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder', but I'm not sure that's what you mean.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Thank you for your reply. Yes" Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Is there an expression in everyday language?
What is beautiful, is different for every person?(is it correct?)
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

It's true that 'beholder' is not a common word, but that saying is actually fairly common, at least among native speakers. A similar, though not exactly the same, idea is expressed in 'to each their own' -- perhaps that could help you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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