The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

I enjoy this such an interesting site 

hi
teacher can u help me for learning english speaking.
 

Important for our knowlege very much........ Thank You very much.

very useful material.thanks.

AM very happy to be a member with you excuse me for my bad English
I want to learn how to speak English tel me if a can understand lessons with this method 

Hello Guys,
I have a questions regarding immigrate and emigrate. I've search those words in Cambridge Dictionary Online and found these results below.
immigrate
verb /ˈɪm.ɪ.greɪt/ [I]
Definition
to come to live in a different country
He immigrated with his parents in 1895, and grew up in Long Island.
(Definition of immigrate verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
emigrate
verb /ˈem.ɪ.greɪt/ [I]
Definition
to leave a country permanently and go to live in another one
Millions of Germans emigrated from Europe to America in the nineteenth century.
Thousands of Britons emigrate every year.
Is the two different in the length of stay? The former relates to a temporary situation and the latter being permanent.
Thanks,
Jay

Hello Jay,
No, the length of stay is irrelevant. The difference is that one is about leaving the old country and the other is about arriving in the new country. It can be confusing because both actions happen at about the same time.
So if your friend leaves the Phillippines to live in Australia, they have emigrated from the Phillippines and immigrated to Australia.
Let us know if you have any further questions.
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

hello Adam,
i am a teacher by profession.I wish to be back at work as an English teacher.Well,after a gap i need some courses to refresh. Is there any opportunity to do such courses in Düsseldorf Germany with British council or maybe online.
Best wishes,
neelam

Nice site,Nice to learning

yes its a goob initiation but i want understand english

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