Some verbs, like give and bring can have two different patterns after them:

 

Noun Phrase (Subject) Verb Phrase Noun Phrase
(Direct object)
Prepositional
phrase
She
They
gave
brought
some money
a lot of food
to the old man
for the animals
     >>>>  <<<<
Noun Phrase (Subject) Verb Phrase Noun Phrase
(Indirect object)
Noun Phrase
(Direct object)
She
They
gave
brought
the old man
the animals
some money
a lot of food

These verbs are called double object verbs. When we have two noun phrases after the verb the first noun phrase is the indirect object and the second noun phrase is the direct object.

Exercise

Comments

Hello Aydin,

You can find explanations of clauses and sentences in the Clause, phrase and sentence section of our Grammar Reference.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi! I want to ask and to clear two aspects.

1.) Are there differences in the meaning between the constructs "N + V + N (direct object) + praep. Phrase" and "N + V + N + N (direct object)"? And when yes, what are the differences?

2.) How can I beter and more clear stress and underline something as direct object? For instances, "He bought her some flowers", or "He bought some flowers for her". "Flowers" are in both clauses direct objects.

I thank you for Explanation. Best wishes,
Mike

Hi MikeOne,

For your first question please provide concrete examples. Context is often a key factor and simply looking at patterns in isolation often leads to inaccurate conclusions and 'rules' which create a proliferation of exceptions.

For your second question, I would say the second example highlights 'some flowers' more strongly, but intonation, if the sentence is spoken, would be a far more important element.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Peter,

I thank you for the answer. Now, I think to understand how the meaning that I want can be expressed.
This is the case with aspect 2.)

You asked for an example for the facet 1.). I mean for instance this case:
a.) "The statement conveys solutions to recipients." or b.) "The statement conveys recipients solutions."

Wich one of a.) or b.) stressed and underlined more the importance of "recipients" and wich one the relevance of "solutions"?

Hi MikeOne,

This is a question which does not have a clear answer, I'm afraid. There is not fixed grammatical rule about the position of indirect and direct objects - it depends on usage (what is normal and common or standard) and the particular verb. For example, I would say that sentence (a) sounds fine, while sentence (b) sounds rather odd. On the other hand with other verbs than 'convey' we can move the order around more freely:

I gave a biscuit to him.

I gave him a biscuit.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Peter,
I thank you for the answer and think to understand the pragmatic of the matter or the rule. It is a question of stile and not of pure grammatical definition.

Best wishes for your work here
Mike

Hi Dear Experts,
I have two questions about direct and indirect objects.
first, I've studied in a book (sentence writing simplified by Norwood Selby) that there are four kinds of complements: Direct objects, Indirect Objects,Predicate nominatives and Predicate adjectives;but on the other hand I have heard that subject complements only come after linking verbs(which don't take objects!). I'm confused which one is correct!
And my another question is : " I gave a ring TO MINA." can I call "Mina" here Indirect Object if not,why?. because in sentence "I gave Mina a ring" , Mina is indirect object.

so sooory for my long questions!

best wishes
Mohsen

He Mohsen.k77,

In your second example with the ring, 'Mina' is indeed an indirect object. In the example with 'to Mina' it is usually not formally described as an indirect object but rather as the (direct) object of the preposition 'to'. The meaning is, of course, the same.

Your first question, about complements, is highly complex and the subject of different interpretations by linguists. It goes beyond the scope of this site, which is intended as a resource for language learners, not linguistics students. If you wish to study this then I suggest the relevant wikipedia pages as a starting point:

complements

predicative expression

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Dear Peter,
I fully appreciate your help, and millions of thanks to you and your skilled colleagues...

Best wishes

Mohsen

can u help me. how to make a correct sentence.

"he did mistake a lot" is this sentence grammatically correct. if this sentence are not correct tell me. how to make, would be help really appreciated.

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