Pronouns are words we use in the place of a full noun.

We have both subject and object pronouns:

 

Subject Object
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it
we us
you you
they them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

This is Jack. He’s my brother. I don’t think you have met him.
This is Angela. She’s my sister. Have you met her before?
Talk to a friend. Ask them to help you.
You could go to a doctor. They might help you.

Subject pronouns

We use subject pronouns as subject of the verb:

I like your dress.
You are late.
He is my friend
It is raining
She is on holiday
We live in England.
They come from London.

 

Warning

Remember: English clauses always have a subject:

His father has just retired. Was a teacher. > He was a teacher.
I’m waiting for my wife. Is late.  > She is late.

If there is no other subject we use it or there. We call this a dummy subject.

 

 Object pronouns

 We use object pronouns:

• as the object of the verb:

Can you help me please?
I can see you.
She doesn’t like him.
I saw her in town today.
We saw them in town yesterday, but they didn’t see us.

• after prepositions:

She is waiting for me.
I’ll get it for you.
Give it to him.
Why are you looking at her?
Don’t take it from us.
I’ll speak to them

Exercise

Comments

Dear Sir

Could you explain me what a subject and object mean?

.

Thank you

Hello Muhammad Umar,

A subject is usually the person or thing doing the action of the verb. The object is usually the person or object that the action of the verb is being done to. For example, in 'She kissed her son', 'She' is the subject (the person kissing) and 'her son' is the object.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi everyone:)

I would like to ask you something.

I don't understand why the right answer of this exercise is "them" - "Have you talked to a lawyer? They can tell you your rights."

Why "they" - a lawyer is а singular.

Helo galiakacarska,

This is explained above:

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

Since lawyers can be men or women, people often use 'they'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

@Dear Kirk. "Thanks a Lot" for the explanation.

Hello,
Which form of the pronoun is correct after ‘like’ ?
Children like he should be taught...
Or
Children like him should be taught...

Regards,
Petals

Hello Petals,

In cases like these, 'like' is a preposition, and pronouns go in their object form after prepositions. Therefore, the correct sentence is the second one (with 'him').

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, everyone. I see some non-native learners find some difficulty about pronouns, but anyway, English pronouns are very "logical" and easy to grasp. Our language, Japanese are not logical, in a way since Japanese has no personal pronouns at all. I used to be a Japanese teacher for foreigners and we teach them "わたし(watashi)" is "I", but it is NOT, in fact. There are more words meaning "I" in Japanese and we use one of them depending on who speaks, where that person speaks, to whom that person speaks etc. We do not have one common pronoun as "I" in Japanese and this makes even us, native Japanese, confused in some cases. Best wisher for non-native English learners!

Thanks Peter or Kirk. I want to ask...

"Don't worry, he's a bit strange sometimes. Just ignore him"
I have a mistake at this sentence. My answer is "just ignore it" cause I mean that just ignore a bit strange. "just ignore it" is right ?

"Have you talked to a lawyer?
They can tell you your rights."
we ask "have you talked to a lawyer", "a" word is special in this case to press the question, right?, if not why we add "a" word in the question? if we ask "have you talked to lawyer" is ok ?

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