Some verbs are two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases). They consist of a verb and a particle:

  • grow + up
    >> The children are growing up.

Often this gives the verb a new meaning:

  • take + after
    >> She takes after her mother
    = She looks like her mother, or She behaves like her mother.
  • count + on
    >> I know I can count on you
    = I know I can trust you, or I know I can believe you.

Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) have only one pattern:

N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

[Note: N = noun; V = verb; p = particle]

N (Subject)  Verb Particle  N (Object)
She
I
My father
takes
can count
comes
after
on
from
her mother
you
Madrid


Some transitive two part verbs (see Clauses, Sentences and Phrases) are phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs have two different patterns:

• The usual pattern is: N + V + N + p

 

N (Subject) Verb (N) Object Particle
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours
back
over
behind

 
• But sometimes these verbs have the pattern: N (subject) + V + p + N (object)

 

N (Subject) Verb Particle N (Object)
She
He
We
gave
knocked
will be leaving
back
over
behind
the money
the glass
our friends and neighbours

When the object is a personal pronoun,these verbs always have the pattern:

N + V +N + p:

  • She gave back it
    >> She gave it back
  • He knocked over it
     >> knocked it over
  • We will be leaving behind them
    >> We will be leaving them behind

• Phrasal verbs are nearly always made up of a transitive verb and a particle. Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up
   





 

 

 

Exercise

Comments

Hello tanya,

I don't understand what you mean. You could say 'he could reach the glass that was in the cupboard and got it out' or 'he got a glass out of the cupboard', but 'reach' doesn't imply moving the glass here. Does that help?

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for your help, Kirk.
But it would be correct to say, informally, 'Reach me that glass out of the cupboard'? I'm trying to understand the difference.

Hello tanya.g,

No, that wouldn't be correct. 'Reach' is used with an indirect object in this sense, and without the meaning of motion, as Kirk said:

Could you reach that cup in the cupboard for me?

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Can you please differentiate between phrasal verbs and phrasal nouns with examples.

Hello ananthan56,

I'm not sure what you mean by 'phrasal nouns'. Do you mean the noun phrase? Or perhaps compound nouns? Or possibly something else?

Please give us an example of what you mean, and we'll be happy to answer your question.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I m confuse about phrasal verbs how to use it?
Take off is a separable phrasal verb
I took off my shoes.
I took my shoes off.
which is correct? Why

Hello sarojghadei77,

The word 'separable' in 'separable phrasal verb' means that the verb and the particle can be separated, i.e. other words can go between them, as in 'I took my shoes off'. The verb and particle can also go together, however, as in 'I took off my shoes'. There is absolutely no difference in meaning between them.

This is just the way phrasal verbs, work, I'm afraid – I would advise against trying to understand why they work or mean what they do – it's much better just to accept them.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Please tell me
whether "She takes after her mother."has also the meaning" Her mother is the owner of a company and she will be the owner after her mother's retirment."
Thank you.
Srilal

Hello andrew,

No, that 'take after' doesn't mean that. You can find definitions and examples of 'take after' in the dictionary – see the search box on the right side of this page. If I understand what you want to say, you could use 'take over': 'She is going to take over the company after her mother retires.'

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Could you explain what does " to train under" mean? I don't actually know is this a phrase verb or not, but I'd be greatful if you would give the explanation.
Thanks for your help.

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