Common verbs followed by –ing nouns are:

Verbs of liking and disliking:

  • detest
  • dislike
  • enjoy
  • hate
  • fancy
  • like
  • love

I love swimming but I hate jogging.
They always enjoyed visiting their friends.
A: Do you fancy going for a walk?
B: I wouldn’t mind

Phrases with mind:

  • wouldn’t mind (= would like)
  • don’t mind (= I am willing to)
  • would you mind (= will you please…?)

I wouldn’t mind having some fish and chips.
I don’t mind waiting for a few minutes.
Would you mind holding this for me?

Verbs of saying and thinking:

  • admit
  • consider
  •  deny
  • imagine
  • remember
  • suggest

Our guide suggested waiting until the storm was over.
Everyone denied seeing the accident.

Other common verbs are:

  • avoid
  • begin
  • finish
  • keep
  • miss
  • practise
  • risk
  • start
  • stop

I haven’t finished writing this letter.
Let’s practise speaking English.

Passive form of -ing

Many of these verbs are sometimes followed by the passive form of -ing: being + past participle

I don’t like being interrupted.
Our dog loves being stroked under the chin.

Noun + -ing clause

Some verbs are followed by a noun and an -ing clause:

Verbs to do with the senses:

  • see
  • watch
  • hear
  • smell
  • listen to
  • etc.

We saw everybody running away.
I could hear someone singing.
 

Other common verbs:

  • catch
  • find
  • imagine
  • leave
  • prevent
  • stop

I caught someone trying to break into my house.
We couldn’t prevent them getting away.
 

Exercise

Comments

Dear Kirk,
Thank you very much for your response.
Best wishes,
Livon

Dear Teachers,
Could you please tell about the following construction.
Walking down the street, I found a bracelet.
I have notice sometimes that -ing clauses come before the sentence.It is understood that -ing clause is modifying the subject.
Other than that,would you tell why we use it and how we get the feel to use it. What we can express by using it there?
Please clarify my doubts .
Best wishes,
Livon
 

Hello Livon,

The -ing clause here (an example of a participle clause) tells us what the subject is in the process of doing when the second action takes place.  We could reformulate your sentence as follows:

As/While I was walking down the street, I found a bracelet.

Remember that the -ing form in these clauses can be used for any time reference - past (as in your example), present or future:

Living in London, you will have a higher cost of living.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Pete,
Thank you very much for your reply.
Please keep up the good work !
Best wishes,
Livon
 

Dear Pete,
Thank you for the reply.
Please look at this sentence and its change version. 
The woman who stole the car will go to jail.
The changed version is written viz.
The woman stealing the car will go to jail. 
Would you tell me if both the sentences mean the same. 
Are both these sentences correct?
Could you please tell me how I should have written the changed version that would have meant the same as the first sentence with relative clause.
I would be grateful to you .
Best wishes,
Livon
 
 
 
 

Hello Livon,

The sentences are both correct grammatically, but the meaning is different.  As I said in a previous answer, 'it's worth remembering that in sentences like this the -ing form can represent any time - it actually represents the time of the other action'.  In other words, the -ing form's time reference is the same as the time of the second action.  Here, your second action has a future or present time reference ('will go') and so the 'stealing' has a similar time (future or present).  In other words, the sentence

'The woman stealing the car will go to jail'

suggests that the stealing and the going to jail are not in the past, or are still current.

In your sentence with the relative clause you have two time references: stealing in the past and going to jail as a future or present action.  Therefore an -ing form cannot be used, as it necessarily must have the same time reference as the second action.  You could use it if both actions were in the past ('The woman stealing the car went to jail') but not with different/separate time references.

I hope that answers your question.  I'd also suggest that you look back at the answer I gave to your initial question (quoted above) as it was quite extensive and covered these points already.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Pete,
I appreciate your reply and please keep up the good work.
Best wishes,
Livon

Hi all, 
 
I'm a little confused with the 'Noun + -ing verbs' part discussed above:
Noun + -ing clause
Some verbs are followed by a noun and an -ing clause:
Verbs to do with the senses:
see
watch
hear
smell
listen to
etc.
We saw everybody running away.
I could hear someone singing.
 
I've come across that 'hear, see, make, let' are considered as bare infinitives. Can you please help me with this question?
 
Thank you very much!
Best regards,
SooFen

Hi SooFen,

Many verbs of perception (e.g. hear, see, notice, watch, listen to) can be followed by either the -ing form or the bare infinitive. The difference is that the bare infinitive suggests that the whole activity is perceived, whereas the -ing form indicates the activity is in progress (and therefore hasn't yet finished). For example:

  • I saw a chicken crossing the road. ( = I saw it crossing the road but didn't see it finish crossing.)
  • I saw a chicken cross the road. ( = I saw it cross the road from one side to the other.)

The verbs make and let are not verbs of perception and are followed by the bare infinitive.

I hope this helps you.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,
Thanks a lot for clarifying my doubts.
Best regards,
Soo Fen

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