We use you to talk about people in general including the speaker and the hearer:

You can buy this book anywhere > This book is on sale everywhere.
You can’t park here > Parking is not allowed here.
They don’t let you smoke in here > No smoking here

We use they or them to talk about people in general:

They serve good food here.
Ask them for a cheaper ticket.

… especially about the government and the authorities:

They don’t let you smoke in here.
They are going to increase taxes.
They are building a new motorway.
They say it’s going to rain tomorrow.

Exercise

Comments

sir i want to ask that. can i use pronoun "YOU" with helping verb "IS" in any condition. if yes let me know.
example:- is you happy?
and please tell me when can i use, this sentence (i be at your service)
example:- he be not your boss. (is this right sentence)

Hello Afia shakir khan,

I can't think of any situation in standard English where you would use 'is' with the pronoun 'you'. In some varieties of English, however, I expect you could hear the sentences you ask about. I'm afraid, however, that our site really only focuses on standard forms.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

let me know i this is correct although this example is just for fun:
you is a pronoun.

Hello suraj,

Provided you are talking about the word 'you' then it is correct. It would be helpful to put inverted commas around the word to make that clear, as I did.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello sir,
"my junior becomes senior" what does it mean?
could you please tell me.

Hello Afia shakir khan,

This could mean different things depending on the context. Could you tell us in which context it was used, and quote the whole sentence? Then we'll be able to comment.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

ok sir i'll give you the context. the whole sentence is.

worker: sorry sir, but this project will fail. we should do extra to it
boss: i know what is what don't tell me. my junior becomes senior.

and sir one thing i am to ask that is.
"how have you been keeping recently?" what does it mean.

Hello Afia shakir khan,

To be honest, I don't understand the conversation very well. Perhaps the boss is telling the worker that a subordinate (junior) shouldn't be telling a boss (senior) what to do, but I'm not sure.

You can find 'how are you keeping' in the Cambridge Dictionary – see the search box on the right. You might also want to look up 'senior' and 'junior'. Be sure to read all the entries carefully.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hello,
yes sir you are right you have got the right meaning.

the boss is saying that you should not tell me what to do.

"Tickets are sold at the door".

Hi, Could someone please let me know why we used "sold" past tense verb in present tense sentence.

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