Why do we use adverbials?

We use adverbs to give more information about the verb.

We use adverbials of manner to say how something happens or how something is done:

The children were playing happily.
He was driving as fast as possible.

We use adverbials of place to say where something happens:

I saw him there.
We met in London.

We use adverbials of time to say when or how often something happens:

They start work at six thirty.
They usually go to work by bus.

We use adverbials of probability to show how certain we are about something.

  • Perhaps the weather will be fine.
  • He is certainly coming to the party.

 

Try these tasks to practice your use of adverbials.

Task 1

Exercise

Task 2

Exercise

Task 3

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

Hello aris,

No, 'accept' is not a stative verb. It is a normal dynamic verb.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again Mr. Peter M
thank you for your guidance
but. if accept is not stative and is dynamic, how can this sentence be correct?
i am not sure I accept it (and not: I will not accept it/if I can accept it)
there are few words that are not stative but come in this form i mean simple present (they do not tell a regular basis but they come to inform us about the future) would you please enlighten me further anther example is i decide(instead of i will decide) or I go to the pub( instead of I am going to the pub
thank you very much ( you are doing a Godly work)

Hello aris,

The sentences that you offer as not possible are actually quite possible.

'I'm not sure I accept it' - this describes your current point of view

'I'm not sure I will accept it' - this refers to your point of view in the future; you would say this if the offer has not yet been made, but you expect it to be made. For example, I might have a meeting in the afternoon at which I expect my boss to make me an offer, and I am describing it in the morning, saying '(My boss is going to make me an offer and) I'm not sure I will accept it'.

'I'm not sure if I can accept it' - this refers to possibility, not the decision itself. For example, I might want to accept an offer, but be unable to do so because of an earlier promise.

It is also quite possible to say 'I will decide' if the moment of decision has not yet come, and to say 'I'm going to the pub' if we are in the middle of the journey, for example.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Mr. Peter M
thank you very much
best wishes
aris

Hi, sorry to ask a similar question though if the sentence is changed slightly to this: 'After breakfast, we slept.' Does the word 'after' function as a preposition here or an adverb? Thanks again

Hi lisa4512,

'After' is a preposition here. Note that there is a difference between the word and the phrase here. The phrase 'After breakfast' is an adverbial phrase which is made up of a preposition ('After') and a noun ('breakfast').

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello

Is this a correct adverbial phrase: 'after dinner, we walked home.' Is 'after dinner' a correct adverbial phrase?

Kind regards

Hello lisa4512,

Yes, that is correct grammatically. Whether or not it is correctly used will depend upon the context, of course.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again lisa,

I'd suggest the same sentence parser for this sentence. When followed by a noun, 'after' is typically a preposition – looking through example sentences in the dictionary may also be useful in understanding specific words and phrases.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk

Many thanks for your help. I've checked the sentence parser and the link you supplied as well and agree it is a preposition. Though if I change the sentence to the following: 'After we had eaten, we walked home.' Would 'after we had eaten' be now considered an adverbial phrase?
Thanks so much!

Lisa

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