Series 03 Episode 17

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Tess and Ravi talk about a very famous British family and Adam passes on your kind words to Carolina.

Language level: 
1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Task 2

Match the names to the descriptions, according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Task 3

Write the numbers of the kings and queens (in words) into the spaces.

Exercise

Task 4

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Task 5

Read these sentences about Emily and Roy's family and put the words in the spaces.

Exercise

Task 6

A logic problem. Read the information and the clues and type the names in the spaces.

Exercise

Task 7

Drag the words into the right spaces.

Exercise

Task 8

Write the missing words in the spaces. Use 'older', 'oldest', 'younger' or 'youngest'.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

Do you live in a country which has a king or queen? Did you have to learn the names of kings and queens in history at school? Are the names for family members more specific in your language than in English? And do tell us about your family!

Adam

Adam: Hello! Welcome to Episode 17 of the LearnEnglish Elementary Podcast. I’m Adam. Rob is on another business trip this week. I think I’m going to have to find a new presenter if he’s never here!

Today we’re going to hear from Tess & Ravi again and, as usual, they’ll be talking about something British - a famous British family - and I'm sure you've got a pretty good idea who that's going to be.

But first, let's talk about some of your comments on the last podcast. We're following the story of Carolina, a student from Venezuela who's studying in Newcastle in Britain. And in the last podcast Carolina had a very bad day - so we asked you to tell us about your experiences of being homesick and what you did to make yourself feel better. A lot of you felt very sorry for Carolina and talked about times when you feel (or felt) the same. And you had a lot of good advice for Carolina and other people in the same situation.

Elaheh, who is from Iran but studying in Germany, says she feels very homesick, especially when the weather is cold and rainy! But she can make herself feel better by listening to Persian music, watching Persian films or going to a Persian restaurant. I like Persian restaurants, too.

And our friend Umi, who has lived away from home since she was thirteen, has a lot of suggestions. For example, she says "explore a new place… visit some interesting places in your second home… go out if you feel a bit down". She also talks about how easy it is to keep in touch with your family and friends at home with modern technology, like mobile phones, Skype or sites like Facebook.

And Ahmed from Algeria says Carolina should talk to a friend - "ideally someone who's going through the same experience - she might feel better when she can cheer up someone else". That's good advice.

Some of you are feeling a bit nervous about going abroad in the future, like ewcielinka from Poland and D-life from Turkey. And the good news is that most of you said that feelings of sadness and being homesick don't last for ever. Aigerim from Kazakhstan says she cried a lot when she first left home, but she says "this world is not without kind people and they helped me".

And some of you told Carolina not to worry about her English. Julia from Hong Kong said "It's natural for you to have difficulty speaking English fluently." Julia told Carolina to remember that she can speak in English, but the rude man in the shop probably doesn't speak any Spanish at all.

And to really cheer Carolina up, both Johnny from Brazil and Manasset from Cameroon said how much they liked her voice and her Venezuelan accent.

A big thanks to everyone who wrote in with comments and suggestions. There might be a lot of people around the world feeling homesick and sad, and your messages can be a great help - so keep them coming at www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish or look for us on Facebook.

We'll be finding out how Carolina's getting on next time. But now it's time to hear from Tess and Ravi, talking about that famous British family. 

Tess and Ravi

Ravi: Hello there, we’re back again to talk about the things you think you know about Britain. I’m Ravi.

Tess: And I’m Tess. And today’s topic from the things you chose is… the royal family. We’re going to tell you something about the Queen and her family – the British royal family. What could be more British than that?

Ravi: Let’s take turns, Tess. I’ll start with the Queen. Well, she’s Queen Elizabeth the Second and she’s been queen for a really long time, since 1952. Her father was King George VI and he died when she was 26, so she was quite young when she became Queen and she’s quite old now. She’s married to… Tess?

Tess: She’s married to Prince Philip. He’s five years older than her and he’s Greek; he was part of the Greek royal family. He’s also known as the Duke of Edinburgh and he’s also known for being quite… down to earth, he speaks his mind…

Ravi: OK, Tess, I know what you mean. The Queen and Prince Philip have got three children…

Tess: Four!

Ravi: Yes – four children. The oldest one is Princess Anne…

Tess: No she isn’t. Charles is the oldest.

Ravi: Is he? Are you sure?

Tess: Certain.

Ravi: Really? OK then, Princess Anne is the second oldest…

Tess: Yes.

Ravi: And she’s also called the Princess Royal. It’s tricky this when everyone seems to have two names. Members of the royal family usually have a title, like The Duke of Edinburgh or the Princess Royal. Anyway, Anne’s the second oldest…

Tess: And the Queen’s oldest child is Prince Charles. That means he’s the heir to the throne, the next one to be king, after the Queen. His title is the Prince of Wales, so Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales, is the heir to the throne. He’s married to Camilla.

Ravi: What’s her title – Duchess of Cornwall, isn’t it?

Tess: That’s right.

Ravi: But everyone knows he used to be married to Princess Diana, who died in 1997. Now, Charles and Diana had two children.

Tess: Hang on! We said the Queen and Prince Philip had four children. We haven’t done all of them yet. The other two are Andrew and Edward.

Ravi: Oh yeah, that’s right. Prince Andrew – he’s the Duke of York – used to be married to Sarah Ferguson - and Prince Edward, he’s the… erm, Tess?

Tess: The Earl of Wessex. I looked it up.

Ravi: He’s the youngest of the Queen’s children. Anyway, as I said, Charles and Diana had two children, two boys, Prince William and Prince Harry. William’s the oldest, so he’ll be king after Prince Charles. Charles will be King Charles the Third and after that William will be King William the… Fifth, won’t he? 

Tess: Yeah, William the Fifth. He’s second in line to the throne after his dad, Prince Charles.

Ravi: And he’s just got married to Kate Middleton. Right, I hope you’ve remembered all that - lots of names and titles! I think it’s important to say that the Queen isn’t in charge of the country; she doesn’t have any real political power. The Prime Minister is the most important person politically in the country but the Queen is important as a sort of symbol, don’t you think?

Tess: Yeah. I mean, you know, some people don’t think we should have a King or Queen but I think the royal family are quite popular, don’t you? People like them.

Ravi: Yeah, I agree. And I wouldn’t like to be a member of the royal family. They don’t get any privacy – cameras and journalists everywhere! It must be terrible.

Tess: Don’t worry Ravi. I don’t think you’ll ever be a prince.

Ravi: You never know, Tess, I might meet a princess.

Tess: Yes, Ravi. 

Adam

It isn't easy to explain all the names and titles for the British Royal family, especially when everyone has two names. At school, it was hard to remember the names of the kings and queens, because so many have the same name! There are 8 Henrys, for example, and you have to remember the number. And to make it worse, you write the number with old Roman numbers, so I is one and V is five – so Henry VIII is actually Henry the Eighth!

Did any of you have to learn kings and queens at school? And how many of you live in countries which still have kings and queens? Write, and let us know.

Another thing is I noticed when I was listening to Tess and Ravi is how difficult it can be to describe your family in English - how people are related to you and to each other, who's the oldest and who's the youngest. It can be especially complicated when people get divorced and then get married again. For example, one of my friends has two mothers, two fathers, and three brothers. His parents got divorced and then they both remarried. So now he has a mother, a father, a stepmother, a stepfather, a brother, and two stepbrothers! That’s complicated!

I know in some languages, all the family relationships are very clear. In some Asian languages, you have different words for your uncle on your mother's side and on your father's side, as well as different words for older and younger brothers, sisters, and cousins, but in English, you have to explain everything! Is that true in your language?

There are some exercises on the website to help you with the vocabulary and grammar that you need to talk about families. We've got some exercises to practice the different words for family relationships, and some to help you explain who is older and younger. There's even a puzzle to test your logic skills! And if you're as confused as Ravi about the British Royal family, don't worry. There are comprehension exercises to help you with that, too.

Don't forget you can do them online or download the pdf file and print them.

Remember to write and tell us about your families – or your Royal families. You know we really like getting to know more about you. The address is www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish. We always enjoy reading your messages.

And, unfortunately, that’s all we’ve got time for today. But we'll be back soon, with more news about Carolina. So see you next time. Bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the sentences that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

初阶播客 - 系列3

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Elementary Podcasts
Chinese, Simplified

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

Adam惊叹于听众朋友对伦敦的了解程度。而在纽卡斯尔,Carolina在店里遇到了一位非常难缠的顾客,而这不过只是一个非常糟糕的一天的开始。通过我们的播客学习英语!

Elementary Podcasts - Series 3

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Elementary Podcasts
Arabic

آدم منبهر بكل ما تعرفونه عن لندن. فى نيوكاسل تقابل كارولينا عميلاً بشعاً في متجر وتكون هذه مجرد بداية ليوم سيء جداً. تعلم الإنجليزية مع البودكاست!

آدم منبهر بكل ما تعرفونه عن لندن. فى نيوكاسل تقابل كارولينا عميلاً بشعاً في متجر وتكون هذه مجرد بداية ليوم سيء جداً. تعلم الإنجليزية مع البودكاست!

Series 03 Episode 16

English
Podcast data: 
00:00|While you listen|Listen to the whole podcast.

Adam is impressed by how much you know about London. In Newcastle, Carolina meets a horrible customer in the shop and that's just the start of a very bad day.

Language level: 
1 Article (OLD SITE STRUCTURE): 
Task 2

Put the words in order to make sentences from the podcast.

Exercise

Task 3

Put the words in the right spaces to make sentences from the podcast. Don’t look back at Activity 2!

Exercise

Task 4

‘Cat’ is a one-syllable word. ‘Window’ has two syllables. ‘Exciting’ has three. How many syllables do these words have? Put them in the right group.

Exercise

Task 5

Words with two syllables. Do we say ‘window’ (●•), or window’ (•●)? Which syllable is stressed in these words? Put the words in the right group.

Exercise

Task 6

Words with three syllables. Which syllable is stressed? Put the words in the right group.

Exercise

Task 7

Which syllable is stressed? Choose the right one.

Exercise

Task 8

Saying you don’t understand. Put the words in the right places.

Exercise

Leave a comment below!

If you don’t live at home or you lived away from home in the past, do you (or did you) ever feel homesick? If so, what do you do to make yourself feel better? Even if you’ve never felt homesick, what advice would you give to Carolina to make herself feel better?

Adam

Hello. Welcome to episode 16 of the Learn English Elementary Podcast. I’m Adam.

Rob is on a business trip at the moment, but it’s nice to be back. First of all, I’d like to say sorry that there hasn’t been a podcast for a while. Rob and I both had to travel for work this month and we haven’t been around. But one of us is back now with another great podcast for you.

Later on, we’ll be catching up with Carolina and I’m afraid she isn’t very happy this week.

But first, let’s have a look at some of your comments on the last podcast, when we asked you for your thoughts on London.

Tess and Ravi talked about Big Ben and Buckingham Palace but you, listeners, mentioned loads of other things in London: Tower Bridge, Madame Tussauds, the British Museum, Hyde Park, Camden Market, the changing of the guards, Trafalgar Square… even those of you who haven’t been to London seem to know a lot about it.

And it wasn’t just London. You also mentioned Oxford University and Stonehenge and the city of Bath - other places you’d like to visit in England. A few of you are fans of English football – like Mohammed in Jordan who really wants to visit Wembley Stadium.

Sora from Korea is lucky; she’s going to study in London in September. Write and tell us how you find it, Sora.

And there’s good news too for Tanya in Russia and Angelo in Italy. Tanya mentioned Sherlock Holmes and Angelo talked about seeing the famous doubledecker buses in London. Well, both of those things will be in a future podcast – so keep listening out!

So many great comments, as usual – too many to read out all the good ones – but I do want to look at just one more. It’s from Raviha in Pakistan and it says ‘Rob, I love your Word on the Street series’.

Now, if you don’t know, Word on the Street is a TV programme made by the BBC and the British Council and you can find it on the LearnEnglish website. Go to: www.britishcouncil.org/wordonthestreet

And that’s almost the same address to send your comments to. We love hearing from you, so keep the comments coming to www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish

Right, time now to catch up with Carolina again. Carolina is from Venezuela and is studying at Newcastle University. We’ve been following her life. Last time there was good news for Carolina’s friend Emily, but this time things aren’t going too well for Carolina… 

Carolina

At the shop

Carolina: That's four pounds please. Thank you. Would you like a bag? OK. Who's next?

Man: I am.

Carolina: Oh, yes. OK, that's two pounds nineteen please.

Man: How much?

Carolina: Two pounds nineteen.

Man: Ninety or nineteen? I can't understand you.

Carolina: Nineteen. Two pounds nineteen pence.

Man: "Two pounds nineteen pence". Why don't you learn to speak English?

Carolina: I… I do… I… I'm sorry…

At University

Mrs Greenwood: So that's it for today. I'll see you next week. If anyone wants to talk about their essay, I'll be in my office from two to five tomorrow afternoon. And don't forget, the deadline for the essay is Monday morning. And that's the absolute final deadline. I will not accept any essays after that time. Is that understood?

Students: Yes, Mrs Greenwood.

Mrs Greenwood: I'm looking forward to reading them. Right, OK. Have a good week.

Students: Thank you, Mrs Greenwood / Bye Mrs Greenwood

Carolina: Oh no!

Student: What's up?

Carolina: The deadline. Monday morning. Is she really serious? She really won't accept any essays after Monday?

Student: Oh yes, she's serious. I did a course with her last year. Two people failed because they didn't do their essays on time.

Carolina: Oh, God!

At the Post Office

Voice through microphone: Cashier number five, please.

Carolina: Good morning.

Clerk: Good morning.

Carolina: I want to collect a parcel. It's from Venezuela, for Carolina del Barco. Here's the card.

Clerk: Can I see some identification?

Carolina: I'm sorry?

Clerk: You need to show me some identification.

Carolina: I need to...?

Clerk: I'm sorry, but I can't give you the parcel if you don't show me some identification.

Carolina: I'm very sorry but I don't understand. Can you speak more slowly?

Clerk: I-den-ti-fi-ca-tion. Pass-port.

Carolina: Oh… yes… identification, passport... yes, of course. I'm sorry. Here you are.

At home

Carolina: It's me, Emily. I'm tired. I'm going to go straight to bed.

Emily: OK. Night. See you tomorrow.

Carolina: Goodnight. Hola mamí. I… oh… 

Adam

Oh dear! Carolina sounds really miserable, really homesick.

It happens sometimes when you’re a long way from home. It just takes a few small things to go wrong, and it can make you feel really unhappy. I remember the first time I went to church camp. My parents weren't there, and I was 10, but I was OK until I put ten pence in the payphone and heard my parents' voices. Then I ran away to cry where the other boys couldn't see me.

How about you, listeners? A lot of you don’t live at home or you lived away from home in the past. Do you ever feel homesick? If you do, what do you do to make yourself feel better? Even if you’ve never felt homesick, what advice would you give to Carolina to make herself feel better? Write and tell us what you think at: www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish

Now, one thing that went wrong for poor Carolina was making a mistake with her English – listen to this bit again: Carolina: Oh, yes. OK, that's two pounds nineteen please. Man: How much? Carolina: Two pounds nineteen. Man: Ninety or nineteen? I can't understand you. Carolina: Nineteen. Two pounds nineteen pence. Man: "Two pounds nineteen pence". Why don't you learn to speak English? Carolina: I... I do… I… I'm sorry…

Carolina got confused about the stress of nineteen and ninety – it’s an easy mistake to make. In ‘nineteen’ we stress the second syllable – ‘teen’ and in ‘ninety’ we stress the first syllable – ‘nine’. It makes a big difference.

However, if we are giving a date, like nineteen eighty-nine, we stress the first syllable of nineteen. English can be really difficult sometimes!

If you want help with syllables and stress we’ve put some exercises on the website for you. They’ll help you recognise how many syllables you hear and which syllables are stressed.

You’ll find lots of other exercises there too so do go and look at the website, and send us your comments – it’s always great to hear from you.

We’ll be back next time with more from Tess and Ravi, talking about a famous British family… who could that be?

That’s all for now. See you next time – bye!

While you listen

Elementary Podcasts are suitable for learners with different levels of English. Here are some ways to make them easier (if you have a lower level of English) or more difficult (if you have a higher level of English). You can choose one or two of these suggestions - you don't have to do all of them!

Making it easier

  • Read all the exercises before you listen to the podcast.
  • Look up the words in the exercises that you don't know in a dictionary.
  • Play the podcast as many times as you need.
  • Play each part of the podcast separately.
  • Read the transcript after you have listened to the podcast.

Making it harder

  • Listen to the podcast before you read the exercises.
  • Only play the podcast once before answering the questions.
  • Play the whole podcast without a break.
  • Don't read the transcript.

Now, listen to the podcast and do the exercises on the following tabs.

Choose all the answers that are true according to what you heard in the podcast.

Exercise

Pages

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