After a breakfast of fresh eggs, Stephen helps the farmer while Ashlie prepares for lunch.

Do the first two Tasks while watching the video, then try the third and fourth Tasks. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello LearnEnglish Team,

Stephen says "Well, there are lots of eggs." I wonder if "lots of" is only used when speaking or it is also used in writing? Ashlie or Stephen always says "lots of", but I've always heard that it should be "a lot of" instead. What do you think? Thank you.

Hi Pocoyo,

That really depends on the text that you're writing. In emails to friends, I've used 'lots of' lots of times. On the other hand, when I wrote research papers in graduate school, I don't think I ever used 'lots of' even once. As you can see, 'lots of' is perfectly appropriate in some instances - mostly informal ones - but not in others (normally formal).

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk,

Thanks a lot for your explanation! : )

why my comments do not appear ouh...so that my friends can help me...everytime i write it says it is awaiting adminiration..

Hello MamaAisha,

You have published comments on this page, on the Farming Scene 1 page and on the Farming Scene 1 Language Focus Page. Comments don't always appear immediately on LearnEnglish, because we check them before they're published.

Best wishes,

Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

This video is just top grade and Ashlie and Stephen are super cool.I love them and their delicate humour as well.

Dear sir which sentence is correct?
The parrot was afraid to see the angry crow.So it flew away disappointed.OR So it flew away disappointedly.
please help.

Hello Arvind Kumar Singh,

The correct answer is that both words are possible, but the meaning is different.  If we use the adverb ('disappointedly') then we are saying how the parrot flew - that the bird flew in a disappointed way.  If we use the adjective ('disappointed') then we are saying how the bird felt, and we would often add a comma before the adjective.  We can see this clearly with a different word:

I walked away happily. [my walk was in a happy style]

I walked away, happy. [I felt happy as I walked away]

Obviously, it's hard to visualise a disappointed style of flying, so from the context of your example the adjective ('disappointed') much more likely.

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you sir for helping me.

Hello! I just want to ask if what did Ashley mean when she said: "I'll make the lunch, you do the sheep", did she mean: "I'll make the lunch and you do the sheep work"? Thank you!

Pages