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Adverbials

Adverbials are words that we use to give more information about a verb. They can be one word (angrily, here) or phrases (at home, in a few hours) and often say how, where, when or how often something happens or is done, though they can also have other uses.

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how adverbials are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Comments

It's really helpful.

Hello,
I would like to ask the following
1.Can we use the : short of in order to say up to a point.
For example
Question : Did you understand what I said?
Answer :Short of(up to point?, a little rtc)
Thank you in advance

Hello Nagie23

Yes, though please note that it's 'sort of' (or 'kind of'), not 'short of'.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Can "more than"/less than/as good as etc. be used as phrasal adverbs in example sentences :-
1. He was more than(meaning very) deserving.
2. Less than 40 People were present(less than is modifying forty)
3. It is as good as(meaning almost) lost.
Best regards

Hello Bharati,

Yes, all of those sentences are fine, though very prescriptive grammarians might insist on Fewer than 40 rather than less than 40 to avoid using less with a countable noun. To be honest, though, it is very common to use less in this way, especially in modern English.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Peter,
Thanks for your guidance.
May i ask if phrases like "let alone/not to mention/much less/what to talk of"etc are also used as adverbials modifying the residual part of the sentence in sentence like
"He was incapable of leading a bowling team, let alone/much less/what to talk of/not to mention a country"
Best regards

Hello Bharati,

Phrases like these, and similar ones such as never mind and still less, are conjunctions.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter,
Thanks for your reply. May i ask if the above phrases will qualify as co-ordinate conjunction though no grammar book has a mention of them as Conjunction.
Best regards

Hello Bharati,

Yes, I would say so. If you look the phrases up in a good dictionary then you'll see that they are classified as conjunctions:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/still%20less

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/never%20mind

 

There are so many conjunctions in English when phrases are included that it's well nigh impossible to list them all. Most grammar books for learners simplify the list of coordinating conjunctions to the most common and useful seven, using the acronym FANBOYS. There are, however, many more.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I have a question
What does the phrase between brackets describe?Carriages used to be drawn( by horses.) *
1. used to
2. carriages
3 drawn

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