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Conditionals 2

Do you know how to use third and mixed conditionals?

Look at these examples to see how third and mixed conditionals are used.

We would have walked to the top of the mountain if the weather hadn't been so bad.
If we'd moved to Scotland when I was a child, I would have a Scottish accent now.
If she was really my friend, she wouldn't have lied to me.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar test 1

Conditionals 2: Grammar test 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Do you know how to use third and mixed conditionals?

Third conditionals and mixed conditionals

Conditionals describe the result of a certain condition. The if clause tells you the condition (If I hadn't been ill) and the main clause tells you the result (I would have gone to the party). The order of the clauses does not change the meaning.

If I hadn't been ill, I would have gone to the party.
I would have gone to the party if I hadn't been ill.

Conditional sentences are often divided into different types.

Third conditional

The third conditional is used to imagine a different past. We imagine a change in a past situation and the different result of that change.

If I had understood the instructions properly, I would have passed the exam.
We wouldn't have got lost if my phone hadn't run out of battery.

In third conditional sentences, the structure is usually: If + past perfect >> would have + past participle.

Mixed conditionals

We can use mixed conditionals when we imagine a past change with a result in the present or a present change with a result in the past.

1. Past/Present 

Here's a sentence imagining how a change in a past situation would have a result in the present.

If I hadn't got the job in Tokyo, I wouldn't be with my current partner.

So the structure is: If + past perfect >> would + infinitive.

2. Present/Past

Here's a sentence imagining how a different situation in the present would mean that the past was different as well.

It's really important. If it wasn't, I wouldn't have called you on your holiday.

And the structure is: If + past simple >> would have + past participle.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar test 2

Conditionals 2: Grammar test 2

Language level

Intermediate: B1
Upper intermediate: B2

Comments

Hi,
sorry if I introduce myself here, but I need to communicate to someone in order to know how to get a quick help. I mean, if there is a place here, where people can ask about doubts and to learn English.

Hi Fade, you can post your questions through comments if you have any doubt about any topic.

Hi FadeFade,

You can also use the comment sections on each page - this is a comment section, for example - to ask questions. The LearnEnglish Team is comprised of experienced teachers, trainers and authors and we try to help users where we can. However, please remember that our primary role on LearnEnglish is maintaining the site and adding new content, so we do not have unlimited time to answer questions! The more detailed the question, the less likely it is that we will have time to answer it, so please keep questions short and precise, ideally including a specific example about which you wish to ask; please do not ask very general questions about large areas of grammar as it is simply not possible for us to write extensive explanations in the comments sections - that is, after all, what the site content is for! Please also check the existing pages, particularly the grammar pages, to see if the answer to your question is not already there.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hello
I'd like to ask about dependent prepositions, actually with verb agree we can use "on" and "with". which case is better to use "on" and "with"

thanks a lot.

Hello dato86,

The different is what the object of each can be. Some can only be used with one; others can be used with either. For example, we can 'agree on' a point, a topic, an issue, a question, amongst other things; we 'agree with' a person, a point, a suggestion, a comment amongst others.

For more examples, try looking the words up using our Cambridge Online Dictionaries tool, which you can see on the right of the page.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much for your help. and one more question please, I'd like to talk to anyone to improve my speaking ability and is here any chance to do that?

Thanks a lot and Best wishes,

Hello dato86,

You're welcome - we're happy to help. I'm afraid chat/conversation isn't something we arrange here on LearnEnglish. In fact, if you look at our House Rules you'll see that we ask users not to share nor ask for contact details such as Skype or email addresses, Facebook names and so on from other users. This is because we have users of different ages on the site and so must be very careful with personal data.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I`d like to chat with someone to improve my english too so if you want to you can add me on FB to chat sometimes! here is my fb account --------------

Hello StrangeGr,

You can communicate with other users via the comments sections which you can find on most pages. However, we ask users not to share or ask for contact details such as Skype or email addresses, Facebook names and so on from other users (see the LearnEnglish House Rules). This is because we have users of different ages on the site and so must be very careful with personal data.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi. I liked this is site, but my english is very bad. I learn about clause condicional. I don't think dificult.

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