This time, Rob and Stephen are thinking about 'think'. Oh - and, by the way...

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Language level

Intermediate: B1
Upper intermediate: B2

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can you please help me??
" i bloody well can...." and "i can bloody well..." 
are these meant same? and please explain the structure of both phrases in reference with adverb and adjective. in second phrase 'well' is working as an adverb and 'bloody' as  an intensifier or as adjective
Interpret please... waiting for answer

Hello,
Firstly, I'm sure you know that the word 'bloody' is seen as mildly offensive in British English, so you should avoid using it unless you are confident you know how you will be understood.
I would say that the answer to your question depends on whether the examples you give are being used on their own or with additional verbs and, if there are additional verbs, it depends on where they are added to the sentence.
In general, there probably isn't any difference in meaning and both mean that the speaker believes strongly that s/he is able or allowed to do something. However, if you add a verb in the middle of the second sentence, then 'bloody' modifies 'well'. For example, 'I can swim bloody well' means 'I am a very good swimmer'. On the other hand, 'I can bloody well swim' or 'I bloody well can swim' mean 'I am very sure I am able to swim.'
I hope that helps!
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Where can I bought these cool 'british' cushions? :DD

Hello Amanda,
I found a lot in UK shops by searching for 'Union Jack Cushions' on the web. It might be harder for you in Brazil.
Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, Could someone explain me difference between on the way and in the way??

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