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Episode 03: Kicked out!

Harry sure is good at his job as he doesn’t come cheap!

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hi,

Those two idioms mean the same thing, one is just a shorter and more modern version of the other.

You asked another question in a different comment about old-fashioned words. Before I answer it, I want to explain that we are a small team here and we don't have time to answer every question that every learner asks. As a general rule, please wait a while after asking a question to ask another one. If you ask a second question before you have the answer to the first, you're probably asking too quickly!

You can use words and idioms that are labelled as old-fashioned in the dictionary, but (probably it's the same in your language) there's a chance that some people won't know them very well or you might sound a little strange, like a character in an old novel. Personally, I sometimes like to use old words, but I know how they sound, so you might prefer to wait until you are more confident in English before you do the same.

Best wishes,

Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi LearnEnglish Team sometimes I find in dictionary is written beside some words old-fashioned words or idioms . is it ok if I use them?

Mr AdamJK Thanks for replying. you really are a good egg.

Hi learnEnglish Team....
I'm always like a rabbit in the headlights when I speak English. What should i do?

Hi,

It's hard to give you advice, because we don't know you! Different people have different reasons for finding it hard to speak. Do you find that you can speak English OK when you are on your own, without anyone listening to you? That might help you decide what the reason for your problem is.

There is some advice about speaking on our help page: http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/help

Best wishes,
Adam
The LearnEnglish Team

now.. here I have several doubts... I know I can say "I'll be back with you", but can I also say "I'll be back to you"? and if I say "I'll get back to you" it's saying something different, like say "I'll contact to you"

thanks for your support, and thank you so much for this website, we really appreciate your time and effort to help us in learning english :) I send you a warm hug from Mexico!

Hello Blume,

What context are you thinking of? 'I'll be back with you in a moment' sounds like something you could hear in a shop, when the shop assistant needs to attend a phone call momentarily, but 'I'll be back to you' sounds a little strange to me there, though people would understand.

Thanks also for your kind words – it's always great to hear that people appreciate our work!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I’ll just get a coffee ( is it means, that Fadi brings his Koffe to the table? or he will dring his koffe at the bar and than come back to the table?)
Thanks a lot!

Hello Mirgorod,

It means the first of those - Fadi is going to get a coffee and bring it back to the table. If he wanted to say the latter then he'd probably say something like 'I'll just finish my coffee, then I'll join you'.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello LearnEnglishTeam !
I'd like to know the meaning of the expression ( keep a head of the game! ) !!
Thanks alot :)

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