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Episode 04: We have a mission!

Sarah will be kicked out of her flat soon and so everyone is on a mission… 

Do the Preparation task first. Then listen to the audio. Next go to each Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

I don't now the mean of the sentence "I like to keep them keen" . Please tell me it's mean !

Can anyone say for me that why using "He's asked for loads of money" but not using "He asked ..." . I think it's a pressing sentence ?

Hi chichiri,

Are you asking why the verb ask is sometimes used with for and sometimes not? In general, ask for is used to ask someone to give us something and ask (without for) is used to ask someone to tell us something. If that's not what you meant, please explain in more detail.

As for your other question above, if you look up keen in our dictionary (see the search box on the right), you'll see it means eager or very interested. Fadi is explaining why he never has a girlfriend for more than two weeks. According to him, it's because he's only interested in women who are very interested in him.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!I need your help.I've read this sentence in a book. "The first brother to arrive took all the upstairs rooms for himself." I understand the meaning, but the grammar of this sentence is not clear for me.I think it means THE BROTHER ARRIVING FIRST TOOK...Am I right? Can we use infinitive in this case?Does the infinitive have such a function? I know,it is not about your lessons,but it is about English grammar and that is why I hope that you'll help me.Thank you for your help and goodwill.

Hi mehinaydinli,

Yes, you've understood this correctly - good work! The infinitive can be used like this to express a future meaning, and as you surmise, is similar to a relative clause. This is not so common in speaking, nor writing really, but is a handy bit of grammar to be familiar with.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi mehinaydinli,

Yes, the sentence you quoted is correct. This use of the infinitive is uncommon, especially in speaking, and as far as I know is only used after 'the first/second/etc.', 'the last', 'the only/earlier/next + one'. Since it has such a limited range, we don't have any explanation of it here, and with a quick internet search I couldn't find it either. Sorry!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi teachers,
In conversation of this episode, they used linking sounds in pronunciation. It's difficult for non native English speaker to understand and speak smoothly in the real conversation. It seem to be not related to this episode but It would be very useful for us, English learners to understand and speak English as native speakers. Could you propose how to practice this technique?

Hi Light_Tran,

I would suggest that you use the transcripts which we provide with our listening materials.  First do the exercises as normal, without the transcript.  Then listen with the transcript so you can see and understand the whole text.  Next try reading the text aloud.  After than, try reading it again but this time at the same time as listening to the recording.  Try to keep up with the speaker on the recording.  This will force you to speak at a natural speed and to include natural pauses, stress, weak forms and contractions - it is a very useful technique.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear Peter, Hi;
Thank you so much for the suggestion. Yes, I believe It is a very useful technique to improve listening skills and at the same time would help us to understand and learn some points related to nature of this language. Thank you.
Rita

i like it

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