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Camden Scene 2 - Language Focus

Rob talks about the sort of questions people ask when they go clothes shopping.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities.

Task 1

Language Task

Match the beginnings and endings.

Exercise

Task 2

Language Task

Are the sentences from a clothes shop or from a restaurant?

Exercise

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hi Ninochka,

What Ashlie says is:

Yeah, that reminds me of the time Stephen went to Spain. He had to eat fast food every day because he couldn't order anything in Spanish.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks =)

HI!

Could you please explain the following sentences/questions.
How did you get on?
Lunch is on me
We've got to get a move on.
Unless you prefer the green ones?

Thanks

Hello udaka,

It's difficult to explain some of these without knowing what part is confusing. However, I'll help with those that I can.

How did you get on?

This means 'Did things go well?' or 'Were you successful?' An appropriate answer might be 'It was fine, thanks.'

Lunch is on me

This means that the speaker will pay for lunch.

We've got to get a move on.

This means there is little time and it is necessary to hurry.

Unless you prefer the green ones?

I'm afraid I don't know what part of this is confusing.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Team, Could you please help me with these confusion.
Ashlie : Shopping with Stephen is nightmare. It took him ages to find a present for Mum.
================
Sorry Team, I get a little bit distracted with Ashlie's conclusion. How can she said " it took him ages to find a present for Mum".
In fact, I watched that Stephen was faster than Ashlie in finding a present for their Mum.
or my understanding is wrong?
Thanks.

Hello Nizam,

This is meant to be funny, showing Ashlie's perspective, which isn't very accurate! You've understood it well.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter,

Can you help me with the pronunciation of this sentence : "Why don't you try them on and see if they fit?"

I don't understand clearly if Stephen say "Whyn't you try them on..." or "Why on't (without "d") you try them on " .

What I'm interested in, is how Stephen physically says those words.

Hope you understand what I mean.

Hello Costinlonut,

When I listen to Stephen saying that sentence, I don't hear him leaving out any consonants or vowels, though of course he does pronounce the words in a connected way that is typical of native speakers' speech. I think he does pronounce the 'd' - what I hear is something like /wɑɪdontʃu trɑɪðəmon ɛn siː ɪf ðɛɪfɪt/ - 'why don't you', 'try them on' and 'see if they fit' are all closely connected.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Everybody,
Could you help me how to use "booking" and "reservation"? Is there any difference between them?
Thank you.
Best regards.
TH

Hello Hà Thanhh,

There is no real difference in meaning but there are tendencies in use. For example, we can book or reserve a hotel room but we usually reserve a restaurant table and book an act (for a theatre or party, for example).

If you have a particular context in mind then we will be happy to comment on it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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