You are here

Oxford Scene 2

Stephen explores the ancient city of Oxford and meets some girls who are studying at the University. 

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Task 1

After you watch

What did you learn about Oxford?

Choose the best answer to these questions.

Exercise

Task 2

Comprehension Task

What did you learn about Oxford?

Put the sentences into the correct order.

Exercise

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello G,

I'm afraid it's not all that clear to me, either. I'd need to know the context to have a chance at explaining the meaning accurately to you, though I think what you say is probably correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hey,
I do not know why U write "Yep" in the first scene and "Yup" in the second one !!

Hello Aya Hamza,

People say both 'yep' and 'yup' (i.e. with different vowel sounds) and so both spellings are commonly used. There's no difference in meaning – both mean 'yes'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello
Can you explain me what does it mean sentence: "Wow, it’s really nice down here." especially the word: "down" ? What does it mean in this context. thx

Hello scarcies,

We can say 'down here' or 'up here' to mean 'in this place'. It really depends on how the speaker sees the place in relation to where they are from or where they have been. For example, if a person is from the north then when in the south (thinking about a map) they might say 'down here'. If a person lives in a town and goes to the river (which is usually lower than the land) they might say 'down here'. It's more a psychological description than a physical one: it's how we see a place, not how it really is.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

what does it mean "off" of "Yup, off we go!"? Thanks

Hello hocon,

'off we go' is an informal way of saying 'let's go'. This is not easy to see, but if you look at the first entry for 'off' in the Cambridge dictionary, you can see how it means to move from a place, and that's how it's being used here. Compare the fourth and seventh example sentences ('She's off' and 'I'm off'), where it's used in a similar way.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

could you please to explain why put Apostrophes in this word (While Ashlie’s in her exam)
Is that for possession

Hello Nermeen Eletriby,

The apostrophe here is not for possession, but as part of a contraction. Ashlie's here means Ashlie is.

Hello Hugong,

All of those sentences are possible, though the last sentence should be without 'up'.

Although we're happy to try to help users with various points of grammar, we really can't deal with multiple questions from single users on particular points like this.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I see 3 words "stuff" in the answer of studet 2. "Loads of stuff"- she meant a lot of activities, didn't she?.
How about the second and the third? It's sunny and "stuff " and go punting and "stuff". I don't make it sense.

Pages