Elementary Podcasts: Tess & Ravi

Welcome to Series 2! In this episode Tess and Ravi talk about birthdays, and their guests talk about knitting and favourite food. Do you remember Carolina from Series 1? She’s a student from Venezuela who’s studying in Newcastle and in this episode she goes shoe shopping. What type of shoes will she choose?

Listen to the podcast then do the first exercise to check your understanding. If you have more time choose some of the language practice exercises.

Check your understanding

Exercise

Language practice exercises

Task 1

Tess and Ravi 1

Practise the language you heard in Tess and Ravi’s introduction [00:21].

Exercise

Task 2

Tess and Ravi 2

Practise the language you heard in Tess and Ravi’s introduction [00:21].

Tom’s tip for speaking about birthdays: In social terms, when a child becomes an adult, they stop wanting to have presents on their birthdays. This, of course, is not true. But it does mean that we have to pretend that we don't want presents, and when we give them, we have to make them look not very important.

Exercise

Task 3

Carolina 1

Practise the language you heard in the soap opera about Carolina [14:05].

Exercise

Task 4

Carolina 2

Practise the language you heard in the soap opera about Carolina [14:05].

Exercise

Task 5

Tom the teacher 1

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:05].

Exercise

Task 6

Tom the teacher 2

Practise the language you heard in Tom the teacher’s summary [21:05].

Exercise

Discussion

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello Ali Ibrahiem,

'Phew' is what we say when we are relieved about something. In other words, when we are worried something bad will happen or something will go wrong, but then it does not go wrong, we say 'phew'.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Mr tom
I am one of the British council student ,i have questions in series tow episode one ,section five carolina , them use ones to refer to the shoes ,so1- they use ones because its pair of shoes if there is one shoe i will say this one? , can i use one in the both sentences.
Regards
Ali Ibrahiem

Hello Ali Ibraiem,

Yes, that is correct. We use 'one' to stand for a singular noun and 'ones' for plural nouns so we would tend to use 'ones' when talking about a pair of shoes.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Dear sir i dont know how to start learning the english , i was expecting the british council to send a notification letter to when i would start learning ,
and i was also looking forward to recieve the cost of the tuition fees.

Hello Deleoluwa Geoffrey Akinwande,

LearnEnglish is an entirely free service, so there are no fees to pay and you are welcome to use the materials on the site as often as you wish. As you can see from the information on our Help page (where you can also find suggestions as to how best to start using the site), LearnEnglish is not a course as such, but rather a library of materials for learners to use to improve their English. I hope you find the site useful.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi teacher!
I have a doubt with "that" and "to what" . I don't know if they both are the same meaning. I'm going to write two sentences I've read on the poadcast:"Then draw a line from the word to the
thing that it refers to." And the second one : "... and then draw a line to connect ‘him’ to what it refers to". I don't understand why it's used a different one each time. Thanks a lot!

Hello ssoniacs,

What you should compare here is not 'that' and 'to what' - it's 'to the thing that' and 'to what' that are parallel. They are just two different ways of saying the same thing. Does that help clarify it?

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

thank you very much. I'm a beginner student but I have to learn to say the same thing in different way. Best regards!

Hello guys! What is meant by "don't push your luck" I notice it a lot and belive Tast said it the female presenter in the elementary podcasts

Hi Gambomusa,

You can find push your luck in our dictionary - just type it into the searchbox under Cambridge Dictionaries Online (on the lower right side of this page) and then click Look it up!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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