Who is the most famous fictional detective to have roamed the streets of London? Join Wendy as she learns about Sherlock Holmes.

Watch the video. Then go to Task and do the activities. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

interesting

I visited Sherloch Holmes house at the 221b of Baker Street, it was so fun!

I want to ask about this text "He’s a hero, but he’s a flawed hero in a way. He doesn’t have superpowers in the way that, say, Superman does or the Marvel Avengers. He’s a real human being and you can feel with Sherlock Holmes as you can’t do with Superman, ‘Yeah, I could be like that’."
when he said he is a flawed hero . is this advantage or disadvantage

Hello hayaalqasem,

This really depends on how you frame the idea. When Roger says this, he considers it an advantage, because all of us can relate to an imperfect human being more easily than we can to a superhero with supernatural powers - this is one reason he finds Holmes so interesting. Framed in a different way, however, for example, two young children arguing about their heros, one being flawed could be a disadvantage. Though the word 'flawed' is not one that most young children would know!

I hope this answers your question.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello!

Is it possible to download the video? If yes, could someone please explain how?
Thanks in advance!
CM

Hello Cheryl,

I'm afraid Word on the Street videos are not available for download. Most of our audio podcasts, e.g. Big City Small World and the Elementary Podcasts - are, however.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

I read Agatha Christie 'And Then There Were None' also published as Ten Little Indians for Cambridge English.

Dear teacher I am new here . I have a question. What are the uses of may be and might be?

Hello everybody from The GREAT LearnEnglish Team !!!

I'm glad to be here again and I have a question . Here in the final sentence I cannot quite get the sense of expression ' policing techiques ' . I guess it's something of the kind of ' methods that police use in their work ' , but why not 'police techniques ' , like ' police equipment ' or 'police museums ' ?

Thank you ,

best wishes ,
iliya_b

Hello ilya_b,

You are correct about the meaning. It is possible to say 'policing techniques' or 'police techniques', though the former is more common in modern English. In some contexts the former refers to 'techniques which can be used to do the policing job' while the latter may refer to 'techniques the police have', so there can be a subtle difference in meaning.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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