adverbials of place

 

 

We use adverbials of place to describe:

Location

We use prepositions to talk about where someone or something is.

 Examples:

  • He was standing by the table.
  • You’ll find it in the cupboard.
  • Sign your name here – at the bottom of the page.

Direction

We use adverbials to to talk about the direction where someone or something is moving.

Examples:

  • Walk past the bank and keep going to the end of the street.
  • The car door is very small so it’s difficult to get into.

Distance

We use adverbials to show how far things are:

Examples:

  • Birmingham is 250 kilometres from London.
  • We were in London. Birmingham was 250 kilometres away.

Exercise

Comments

Thanks very much for this help. I applying for cleaning job and this help me.

Hello Ashid,

Congratulations! It's always great to hear that LearnEnglish has helped someone - that's what we're here for!

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

hi
Please explain below adverbial use and meaning of example if possible.
Direction
We use adverbials to to talk about the direction where someone or something is moving.

Examples:

Walk past the bank and keep going to the end of the street.

Hi archijais,

The phrases 'past the bank' and 'to the end of the street' are used as adverbials here in that they give more information about the verb phrase, i.e. where one should walk. You can find definitions of 'past' and 'to the end of' in our dictionary. If you're still not sure about them after looking them up, please write a sentence that illustrates your understanding of them and we'll be happy to check them for you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello bhoj bikram,

Please look up 'by' in our dictionary (see the link on the right), and scroll all the way down the page, where the last entry for 'by' as a preposition and adverb is. You'll see that it means 'near' or 'at the side of'.

It takes some time, but if you look through the dictionary carefully, the meaning is usually there.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi everybody

Can someone of you give to me explanation about ...at - on -in preposition!!?
i confuse the utilization of each of them.

Hello,

I'm confused by following phrases:
• on the internet / in the internet
• log on / log in

I often saw them online. Are there differences between each phrase?

Hello Kiki!

There's not a very big difference between log in/log on. In most cases, both can be used.

For on the internet/in the internet, on the internet is usually better. In the internet is not used very often, except with another word, as in We live in the internet age.

Regards

Jeremy
The LearnEnglish Team

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