The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello Teachers,

I have a little question about a collocation.
In my English textbook, I found the sentence “It is a TV program thirty minutes long.” But is it also right to say “It is a TV program of thirty-minute length.” ?

Best Regards

Hello YSATO201602,

Both sentences are grammatically correct but the second one would be very unusual in such a context. The construction '...of thirty-minute length' sounds very formal and even old-fashioned. It isn't a construction we would use for such an everyday situation.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
Should I say or write
"A book of a particular subject" or
"The book of a particular subject"

Hello SonuKumar,

The phrase would be either

A/The book on a particular subject

 

Both phrases are possible. The choice of article here is no different from any other context: it depends on whether or not you are talking about a particular, known book or just any one of many books on the subject in question.

A book on a particular subject - one of many books like this

The book on a particular subject - a particular book which both you and I can identify

 

You can read more about articles in our section on the subject:

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar/indefinite-article-and

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar/definite-article

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to know if the following sentence is correct
If you want to lose weight you have to be on a diet.As simple as that.
The expressions as simple as that is correct?
Is it also polite?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

Yes, that's fine. The second sentence is not a full sentence (it would be 'It's as simple as that'). Depending on the context (how informal it is and whether this is written or spoken language) it may be better to use a full sentence here.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask about the following
The question: who are you? Is not polite? What does it mean if someone asks this question?
2.Questions like who is he or who are they? Do they have the same meaning as the question in 1st singular?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie

They are neutral, but could be considered polite or impolite depending on the situation and what other things were said before or after them.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to know if the following phrases are correct
1.There is still a lot of work to be done until July
2...as much someone is willing to do work/homework
3. ..as much as someone is willing to receive help from someone (In a lesson; maths etc)
Thank you in advance

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