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Multicultural Britain

Notting Hill Carnival grew out of Caribbean traditions. Today, it is an event where all cultures come together. As Nick’s been finding out, the UK truly is multicultural.

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Task 1

Vocabulary Task

Match the words in the box with the descriptions underneath.

Exercise

Task 2

Vocabulary Task

Read the questions and select the correct answers.

Exercise

Download

Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello. Could you please help me?
Which word is correct in the following sentence? Why?
- Accountants help people with their (finances - finance).
I think both of them are correct here, right?
Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

I'd say 'finances' here, and not 'finance'. 'finances' usually refers to money, but it can also refer to the way someone manages money. 'finance' usually refers to the management of money more than the money itself. In one dictionary entry I saw that 'finance' can also refer to money, but this usage sounds a little odd to me.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, team. I'm confused about the difference between "gap" and "hole". For example: - We can see the sky through a (gap - hole) in the roof.
What is the correct word in such a context?
Thank you all in advance

Hello Ahmed Imam,

In general, a gap is a space between two larger objects -- think of, for example, the space between a train and the platform. That space runs the whole length of the train and is the separation between the two objects.

A hole is usually the space inside a single object. A window, for example, is essentially a hole in a wall.

In the case of your sentence, 'hole' is probably the best choice.

Hope this helps.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. Could you please help me?
What's wrong with the following sentence? Why?
- Before trying on shoes, you should always wear socks.
Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

I think you need to use the verb 'put on' rather than 'wear'.

When you have a time reference like 'before' you need to refer to a particular action which you could take. You could use 'wear' if the sentence referred to a general state rather than an action:

Before trying on shoes, you should always put socks on.

When trying on shoes, you should always be wearing socks.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello. Could you please help me? Which adjective is correct in the following sentence? How can I use them correctly?
- The Clarence Hotel in Exeter is a (historic - historical) one in England.
Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam

There is an explanation of the difference between 'historic' and 'historical' on this Cambridge Dictionary page. Unless I've misunderstood what you mean, 'historic' would be the correct choice here.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Could you please help me?
I looked up the words "mark" and "stain". However, in the following sentence, I can't decide the difference in usage.
- The bark of the tree had made black (stains - marks) on his trousers.
I appreciate your helping me. Thank you so much.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

'Mark' is a very general word. You can make marks on a page with a pen or on a wall with a stone. The weather can leave marks on clothes and time leaves marks on your face.

'Stain' is more specific. It is usually negative (something you do not want) and it is not just on the outside, but in some way has combined with the material so it is hard to remove. Paint leaves stains on your clothes, for example.

In your example I think 'stain' is probably the best choice.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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