Stephen and Ashlie visit the seaside town of Blackpool and have a go on some of the rides at the Pleasure Beach theme park.

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to Task and do the activity. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Task 1

Comprehension Task

Read the questions and select the right answers.

Exercise

Task 2

Comprehension Task 2

Read the questions and select the right answers.

Exercise

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Language level

Intermediate: B1

Comments

Hello Samira_81,

'Have a go' is an expression which means 'try' in the sense of 'take a chance, see if it is successful'. It's quite common in spoken English.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Samira_81,

'Have a go' is an expression which means 'try' in the sense of 'take a chance, see if it is successful'. It's quite common in spoken English.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

ı love amusement park soo much and ı love roller coaster. ı love beach and ı love swimming

Hi , I have one question about this first line .Why he use s plural .Because the word not plural (hour) .

Hi alrabie,

The sentence you are referring to is:

...we’re in Blackpool, in the North of England - about an hour’s drive from Manchester.

This is not a plural form, but a possessive form. It means 'a drive of an hour' or 'a drive which takes an hour'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I don't like amusement parks
Yes, I like going the seaside
I usually swim in the sea when I go to seaside

I have gone to theme parks twice. They are exciting. I am a little scared of the rides. And I like going to beach. Swimming is one of the my favourite activities.

Hello! Just want to know more about the phrase that Stephen used: "about an hour’s drive from Manchester". I'm confused because why didn't he used this phrase instead: "about an hour(without apostrophe) drive from Manchester"? Thanks!

- Aaron

Hello Aaron Matthew T.

We usually use the apostrophe like this when we are talking about distance or time in this way. There are several phrases like this:

 

an hour's drive

a day's work

a lifetime's experience

 

and so on.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Oh i see, but is it also right to use a word without an apostrophe, in this case hour? And can this word with or without an apostrophe be used interchangeably? Thanks Peter!

- Aaron

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