Christmas Scene 1

Ashlie and Stephen are getting ready for Christmas. They need to buy presents and decorate the tree, but there's still time for a bit of ice-skating...

Do the Preparation task first. Then watch the video. Next go to the Tasks and do the activities. If you need help, you can read the Transcript at any time.

Preparation

Before you watch

Think about the following questions:

  • What do you know about British Christmas traditions?
  • What kinds of presents do people buy each other for Christmas?
  • What decorations do people put on a Christmas tree?

Now watch as Ashlie and Stephen do some last-minute shopping...

Transcript

Ashlie: Oh hi, Stephen. You made it then!

Stephen: Hi, Ashlie, I thought we were going Christmas shopping, not ice-skating.

Ashlie: Oh, we are. But I saw the rink and ice-skating is so much fun. It’s almost as much fun as shopping!

Stephen: It’s Christmas Eve and this is the Tower of London Ice Rink. Ashlie and I are supposed to be doing some last-minute Christmas shopping.

Ashlie: We’re cooking dinner for the family this year. They’re coming to Stephen’s to give our mum a rest.

Stephen: And we’ve still got lots of presents to buy. So you shouldn’t be messing around on the ice.

Ashlie: Oh come on, Stephen. Come and have a go. What’s wrong with you? Look watch me - I can go backwards!

Stephen: Stop showing off. Alright, I’ll come on, but just for five minutes - no more.

.....

Ashlie: Come on then. Take my hand. That’s it and we just go in a big circle… like this…

Stephen: It’s not as difficult as it looks. I think I’m better than you. It’s all about keeping your balance.

Ashlie: Stephen, you’re going in the wrong direction.

Ashlie: Stephen! Watch out!

Stephen: Oh, sorry!

.....

Stephen: Oh, I love Christmas, Ash. It’s so exciting.

Ashlie: I know. All the presents, the wonderful food. I can’t wait.

Stephen: Wow, look at these. They’re great. Oh, I love these. Look, it’s snowing! Let’s get some Christmas decorations. These are so cool.

Ashlie: Well, maybe we could get something for the tree. What about some tinsel? I want the tree to look really tasteful and stylish. These are nice.

Stephen: Those are really boring. What we need is lots of different colours to make the tree look really beautiful.

Ashlie: Mmm, well, I’m not sure. I think the tree will look better with just a few decorations.

Stephen: No way! A Christmas tree is meant to be bright and colourful. Oh come on, Ash, let me choose some Christmas decorations.

Ashlie: Well, I suppose so. As long as you don’t get too much. Listen, I want to go and buy your present now, but it’s a secret. So I will see you later.

Stephen: Presents - of course. OK. Bye!

Ashlie: Bye!

.....

Stephen: There... perfect!

Ashlie: Stephen! What have you done? What has happened to the Christmas tree?

Stephen: It looks so much better now, doesn’t it? All bright and Christmassy. It’s as big as the tree Mum and Dad had last year but it looks even better.

Ashlie: But I wanted the tree to be stylish and beautiful. Now it looks like a kid’s decorated it!

Stephen: Do you think we should add some more of these baubles?

Ashlie: No, I really don’t. Just don’t put anything else on the Christmas tree, OK? Come on, let’s hang up our stockings.

Stephen: OK. They look great. And look, I’ve put out some mince pies for when Father Christmas comes down the chimney and some carrots for the reindeer.

Ashlie: Ah, that is sweet of you. Hmm, mince pies! They do look good. I’m starving. I suppose Father Christmas won’t mind if I have one.

Stephen: Maybe one or two won't matter.

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Submitted by May Thida Su on Tue, 23/03/2021 - 07:47

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HELLO ! I have some questions . " all-inclusive holiday ", " budget holiday ", "laid-back holiday" what do they mean ? Please answer me Dear Team. I'll thank to you.

Hello May Thida Su,

An all-inclusive holiday is one where the price you pay includes everything. In other words, you don't have to pay for items (travel, your room, meals etc) separately.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/all-inclusive

 

A budget holiday is one which is not too expensive and suitable for people with a limited amount of money.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/budget

 

A laid-back holiday is one which is relaxed and stress-free.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/laid-back

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by sumaya on Tue, 21/07/2020 - 13:15

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hi i wish you can help me my problem is that i can not remember all the conversation in the video but i understand the the meaning of the video

Hello sumaya,

I'm not sure I remember everything from the video either! Do you mean that it's difficult for you to do one of the tasks? It's a good idea to watch the video several times in general, and especially if you find the tasks difficult to complete. You can also use the transcript if that's easier.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Narina on Fri, 13/04/2018 - 19:19

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Hi everybody. i need some help, How can i translate the expresssion ''women that drew looks on monday then couldn't draw the plow on monday'' in this sentence,. Ella was not strong person, coming from a family of small-boned, almost fragile country ''women that drew looks on monday then couldn't draw the plow on monday.''

Hello Narina,

I'm afraid we don't deal with translation on this site. I can explain the meaning of the phrase, however.

Women that drew looks describes women who attract attention in some way. From the context, I would guess that it refers to physical attractiveness.

...couldn't draw the plough on Monday tells us that they lacked the strength or the will to work in the fields on Monday. The implication, I would say, is that women who are attractive (perhaps slim and small) lack the strength for farm work.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Stephane on Thu, 08/03/2018 - 09:16

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Good morning the Learn English Team, I don't understand why Stephen said Christmassy. What is "Christmassy" and what is the difference between Christmas and Christmassy ? Thanks a lot. Stéphane

Hello Stéphane,

'Christmassy' is an adjective derived from the noun 'Christmas' and means something like 'Christmas-like'. Stephen thinks his work on the tree has made it more beautiful and that the ambience feels more like Christmas because of it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Kien Alang on Sun, 24/12/2017 - 04:17

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Merry Christmas Team, Could you explain the meaning of this sentence "They’re coming to Stephen’s to give our mum a rest.", especially the phrase "to be coming to"? Thank you.

Hello Kenny Alan,

Merry Christmas to you too!

'They are coming to Stephen's' means 'they are visiting Stephen's house'. This is a present continuous form to describe an arranged event in the future. The phrase 'to give our mum a rest' means 'in order to give...' or 'so that our mum can have a rest'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi! I understand "they are coming over to Stephens..." Could it be possible? Thanks

Submitted by Peter M. on Sat, 17/11/2018 - 08:41

In reply to by JOBFER

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Hello JOBFER,

You can say that. Don't forget the apostrophe, however: They are coming over to Stephen's.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Peter M. on Sat, 17/11/2018 - 08:42

In reply to by JOBFER

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Hello JOBFER,

You can say that. Don't forget the apostrophe, however: They are coming over to Stephen's.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Adriancatanescu on Tue, 10/10/2017 - 13:04

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Hello everyone,talking about Christmas is a nice subject to thinking about. I know one of the tradition in Britain is to have a turkey on the dinner,and another thing is to spend the Christmas time with your family,and of course to have Christmas Cracker during the meal Christmas. People can buy all kind of presents but when I used to be a child most of the time my parents give me sweets and sometimes a pair of socks like a present and sometimes pair of gloves because all the time in the Christmas perioud It was a lot of snow,but most of the time I've enjoying receive a toy as a present. When I was a child we used to decorate our Christmas tree with tinsel,baubles and and with colored bulbs. and in this way our Christmas tree it was all the time colorful.

Submitted by Narina on Mon, 09/10/2017 - 13:57

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Hi everybody. I would like to know what "casualty flat" means. I can't translate it.

Hello Narina,

This is not a phrase I have seen before and I can't think what it might mean without knowing the context in which it occurred. Are you sure it is a correct phrase?

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much for supporting me. I found this phrase when translating a medical text. Here is the sentence. " Act quickly: lay the casualty flat on his back, keep from falling back into the throat and blocking the air passages." Thank you!

Hello Narina,

Thank you for supplying the context. 'Flat' here describes how the person should be laid down:

lay (something) down on the ground

'The casualty' means the person hurt in the accident. So the sentence means that the casualty should be laid down (made to lie down) in such a way that they are flat on their back (not curled up or on their stomach).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you very much. I cought the meaning. Now the context is clear to me. You really helped me. We appreciate your work.
Hi Narina Kindly I like to say The sentence inspire that it is taken from first aid book and the practical training is so important in this situations

Submitted by Vyvyan on Wed, 24/05/2017 - 08:23

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hi Team! your lesson is very great. thanks so much!

Submitted by Kien Alang on Wed, 10/05/2017 - 10:35

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Hi Team, I have a question not related this topic, I've seen a sentences like "a factor of two or more". Could you explain the meaning, please? Thanks

Submitted by Kirk on Wed, 10/05/2017 - 18:12

In reply to by Kien Alang

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Hello alangkien,

Usually 'a factor of two' means either 'multiplied by two' or 'divided by two'. Does that make in the context you've seen this expression? You can see more about this use of the word 'factor' in this Cambridge Dictionary entry.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ahnabeel on Mon, 27/02/2017 - 14:29

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i think every nation has their occasion which they celebrate with , religious or nationality .

Submitted by Nizam Balinese on Tue, 24/01/2017 - 06:17

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Hi Team. Stephen : Ashlie and I are supposed to be doing some last minute Christmas shopping. ============== If I change "to be doing" into "to do", Is it allowed in the rule of grammatical? If yes, what is the difference between "to be doing" and "to do" in the sentence? Would you like to explain, please? Thank you.

Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 25/01/2017 - 08:49

In reply to by Nizam Balinese

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Hi Nizam Balinese,

Both 'to do' and 'to be doing' are possible, grammatically speaking.

If we say '...are supposed to be doing...' then we mean that we should be in the middle of doing it at the moment of speaking. The time reference is 'now' for both 'supposed' and 'doing', in the sense of the moment of speaking.

If we say '...are supposed to do...' then we mean that we need to do this and have not done it yet. The time reference is 'now' for 'supposed' and the future for 'do'.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team