Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. We often use them to avoid repeating the nouns that they refer to. Pronouns have different forms for the different ways we use them. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how pronouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Submitted by Kirk on Sat, 17/03/2018 - 16:08

In reply to by Imran 26

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Hi Imran,

Tenses are a property of verbs, so you can find out more about them in the Verbs section. Although there is no section for the future, you can find out about the different forms we use to talk about the future on the talking about the future page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by JenA on Thu, 15/03/2018 - 12:51

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"Budapest, ... is located near the Danube, is a very beautiful city." Is it which or where? Please also give an explanation to why.

Hello JenA,

'which' is the correct answer here. 'where' can be used in situations where you could say 'at which', but that doesn't work here because the relative pronoun is acting as the subject of the clause.

You can learn more about relative clauses on this and this page.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by uchiha itache on Thu, 15/03/2018 - 12:43

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Do we call it a lost treasure or a missing treasure? What I understand is, lost treasure is a treasure in a lost ship ( it's called lost cause no one knows its place ) but a missing one means that someone found a lost ship and didn't find the treasure in it so it's missing ( cause it's not in the place where it's expected to be ) Am I right or not? I'm not really sure

Hello uchiha itache,

What you explain makes sense to me, but for the general public I don't think there is a big difference between 'lost' or 'missing' treasure, as most of us don't really encounter treasures. This Wikipedia entry uses both adjectives separated by 'or', which suggests there may be some difference, but it's not clear to me exactly what that might be.

In any case, unless you're speaking to a group of specialist treasure-hunters, either would probably be fine. I'd probably go with 'lost'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by uchiha itache on Wed, 14/03/2018 - 08:49

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Hello! I want to know the difference between seem and seem to be . I'm confused I read a sentence in practical English usage saying ( he seem older than he is and it also said that it would be wrong if u used here (seem to be) because it would suggest that he is really older than he is) but I read on Cambridge saying ( he is 16, bet he seems (to be) younger than he is ) which is right and how can I differ between them?
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Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 15/03/2018 - 07:10

In reply to by uchiha itache

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Hello uchiha itache,

Both seem and seem to can be used to describe our impression, which may or may not be correct. For example:

She seems intelligent.

She seems intelligent but she is really quite stupid.

She seems to be intelligent.

She seems to be intelligent but she is really quite stupid.

 

 

He seems to be older than he is.

This sentence is not incorrect but it requires a context in which we are still not completely sure about the answer. For example, you might say this if a person claims to be 18 but you find some information which suggests that he is really 23. By using seems to be you show that you are still not 100% certain of the truth. By contrast, if you are completely certain of the person's age then you would say use be:

He is older than he seems.

He is older than he claims.

He is older than he says

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks a lot . I do get it better but there's still something I don't understand You said we use both both seem and seem to be to describe our impression. And you also gave me same examples with both of them. Does this mean they're exactly the same? I read that seem is used for subjective impressions and seem to be is used for objective facts..but actually I don't know what both of them ( subjective and objective ) mean . The boy seems older than he is The boy seems to be older than he is They are used to give exactly the same meaning?? One last thing is...is it fine to say it seems like it's going to rain instead of it looks like it's going to rain? If so, please tell me if there's a difference in the meaning .

Hello uchiha itache,

I don't think there is a fixed difference between seem and seems to be. I think there is a tendencey to use seem to be when there is some kind of supporting evidence (documents, another person's information etc), but I don't think this is fixed.

With regard to your other question I don't think there is any difference between seem and think in this context. Both could be used when looking at the sky and both could be used when reading a weather forecast.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by souba73 on Tue, 13/03/2018 - 12:29

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Hi, Kindly help me to fill in the blank: Each boy & each girl got ............... dues. 1.His 2.her 3.his/her 4.their 5. none of this
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Submitted by souba73 on Wed, 21/03/2018 - 12:55

In reply to by souba73

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Dear Teachers, Could you kindly reply to my query?

Hello souba73,

Sorry about that! We usually ask that our users tell us what they think the answer is, and why, but here I'll just tell you the answer. The correct answer is 4.

In the future, though, please explain to us what you think the answer is.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by sofyan33 on Tue, 13/03/2018 - 04:55

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Hi British Council, My company wants to hold an english course for employees. Can you help us, how to list courses here?

Submitted by uchiha itache on Mon, 12/03/2018 - 18:42

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Do we say ( I miss you ) or ( I missed you ) ?! And if both are right, please tell me everything they could mean

Hello uchiha itache,

Both are possible. 'Miss' is a present form and we would use it if we are still missing the person. 'Missed' is a past form and we would use it if the missing was true in the past but is not true now (perhaps because the person we missed has returned).

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Md.Habibullah on Thu, 08/03/2018 - 01:50

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Sir, What kind of verb we usually should take after "who"? Is there any certain dictation?
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Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 08/03/2018 - 07:04

In reply to by Md.Habibullah

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Hi Md.Habibullah,

Off the top of my head, I can't think of any restrictions on the kind of verb that can follow 'who'. Did you have something specific in mind?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by awahab on Tue, 06/03/2018 - 17:54

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Hi Kirk and Habibullah, Should it be not? "He is among the few who wants to continue working on the project."

Hello awahab,

'the few' is the plural subject of the verb 'want'. 'wants' is a singular form, so it is not correct. The correct form is the plural form 'want'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Ellenna on Sat, 03/03/2018 - 20:22

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Hi. I would be happy if you explain to me the difference between "help me" and "help me out". I've been trying to figure it out by reading definitions in dictionaries, but there aren't many explanations and examples.

Hi Ellenna,

'Help' by itself has a very general meaning. 'Help out' means either to do part of someone's work or task or to participate in a common effort, or else to give someone money.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by learnEnglish_SFE on Sat, 03/03/2018 - 19:47

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Really Britshcouncil is the best to learn and improve our skills
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Submitted by Imran 26 on Fri, 23/02/2018 - 11:14

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Hello Sir, Would you let me know the difference between Passage & Paragraph? I had appear in examination few years ago there was a question like that " Make a summery of below passage".

Hello Imran 26,

When a writer writes a narrative text, they divide it into sections such as sentences, paragraphs and chapters. The writer is the one who makes the divisions between the different sections.

A passage is a piece of a text that someone else has taken out of the text. For example, perhaps your English teacher takes just a sentence or two from a story you read in class. The writer didn't intend for those couple of sentences to stand alone -- it's your teacher who chose them, not the writer.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Mon, 19/02/2018 - 09:06

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Hello Sir, In Pakistan when we talk about Grammar in English, The Grammar books writer make a content in their English Grammar Books for new learns are Parts of Speech, then Tenses, then narrations and after that active/passive voice. They says there are 8 Parts of Speech as Noun,Pronoun,Adjective, Adverb,Preposition,conjections and Interjection. sir, is the above sequence for new learner in English Grammar are correct? do you think native speakers also follow this sequence for English Grammar?

Hello Imran 26,

This is an interesting question. There are lots of different ideas on how to teach grammar and it's also important to consider what the learners' background is. For example, do the students already speak English and are just learning the grammar?

I'm afraid these are all issues that we don't really get involved in here on LearnEnglish. On our sister site, TeachingEnglish, though, I'm sure you could find some interesting discussion of this topic -- for example, searching for 'teaching grammar', I found this page on how to teach grammar.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Md.Habibullah on Sun, 18/02/2018 - 13:57

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He is among the few who want to continue working on the project. Sir,is there any grammatical error?

Hello Md.Habibullah,

That sentence is grammatically correct -- good work!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Sat, 17/02/2018 - 07:55

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I would like to say thanks to British council for provide us such an amazing plat form where we can learn English in congenial environment and special thanks to Sir, Kirk & Sir, Peter and all the team of British Council they are ready to help us and teach us with and amazing way. I truly say that their teacher are really caring, kind and too sincere with us. Thank you all of you.

Hello Imran 26,

Thank you for your lovely comment. It's nice to know we're helping people!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Ellenna on Wed, 14/02/2018 - 20:13

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Could you help me with the following, please: When you write a formal letter, can you open it like "Dear Mr Robert Smith" or it should be "Dear Mr Smith". Thank you.

Hello Ellenna,

In a formal letter you should avoid using the addressee's first name in this way. In other words, you should use 'Dear Mr Smith', not 'Dear Mr Robert Smith'.

One exception to this is when you don't know the addressee's gender, though in this case you don't use the title. For example, the name 'Jordan' is commonly given to both boys and girls in English, so if you needed to write to 'Jordan Smith' and didn't know their gender, you could say 'Dear Jordan Smith'. Note that it's not 'Dear Mr Jordan Smith'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Submitted by SonuKumar on Mon, 12/02/2018 - 07:17

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Sir, I have enough money I have enough of the money They used 10 percent eggs They used 10 percent of the eggs I have more personnel I have more of the personnel I think these are interchangeable and two different ways of writing the same thing isn't it or is there any difference in them ?
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Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 12/02/2018 - 07:51

In reply to by SonuKumar

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Hello SonuKumar,

The use of 'the' here is no different to the use of 'the' elsewhere. It tells us that we are talking about a particular set or group of items, not about something in general.

I have enough money (general)

I have enough of the money (which we brought with us)

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Mon, 12/02/2018 - 05:34

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Sir, 1-Price List for Self-finance materials/Price List of Self-finance materials. What is the correct preposition here for/of?
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Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 12/02/2018 - 07:52

In reply to by Imran 26

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Hello Imran 26,

There is no fixed rule for this but I would say 'for' is the most natural choice.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Sun, 11/02/2018 - 10:55

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Sir, Much more of amazing music or Much more amazing music Many more of the other artists or Many more other artists Enough of the day or Enough day. I think these all are correct and also interchangeable in some specific context but these things confuse my mind revolving around it and I gets into thinking as to which one to use and which not. what should I study in English grammar to clear this confusion out of my mind ?
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Submitted by Kirk on Sun, 11/02/2018 - 17:41

In reply to by SonuKumar

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Hello SonuKumar,

Could you please provide some context for these phrases? 1, 4 and 6 are all a bit unusual. They might be possible in a specific context, which is why it would be much easier to explain them if you provided a bit of context.

Thanks in advance.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Fri, 09/02/2018 - 11:22

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1-Kindly send us the details as per request for customer. 2-Kindly find the attached file as Price list for Self-Finance materials. Sir, did I use correct preposition in above two sentences? I use these sentences twice aweek in e-mail correspondence but I am confuses about there preposition.

Hello Imran 26,

If I've understood what I think you mean, for 1 I would recommend 'Kindly send us the details as requested by the customer' (a customer requested details from you and you need to get them from someone else). For 2, I would recommend 'Please find the price list for self-finance materials in the attached file'.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Fri, 02/02/2018 - 11:01

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Hello Sir, Kindly let me know that how can I recognize a person is talk about His/Her own weeding or another one in below sentences. 1- I am wearing a suit because I'm going to a weeding at one o'clock.

Hello Imran,

Normally a person would say 'my wedding' if they were referring to their own wedding. Since the speaker in this sentence uses 'a wedding', it's likely they're speaking about someone else's wedding.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Imran 26 on Thu, 01/02/2018 - 09:07

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Hello Sir, Yesterday I was studying preposition section in this site but I am confuse about the below sentences which have use in preposition section. kindly teach me can we also use these sentences with preposition as mentioned below. 1-This spray should protect you from mosquitoes. This spray should protect you by mosquitoes. 2-I don’t approve of your language, young man. I don’t approve your language, young man. 3-Our dog died of old age. Our dog died in old age. 4-If you make so much noise I can’t concentrate on my work. If you make so much noise I can’t concentrate at my work.

Hello Imran,

I'm afraid none of the sentences you suggest are correct. They're certainly comprehensible, but we don't use those prepositions that way. Prepositions are often as much a matter of usage (in other words, we just use them the way we use them) than anything else.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by SonuKumar on Wed, 31/01/2018 - 01:51

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This man whom I trusted cheated me. May I rewrite this sentence like this ? = This man cheated me whom I trusted. Can I also write Who instead of whom ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Nowadays, 'whom' is a relatively rare form -- instead most people will use 'who'. It still means the same thing, i.e. 'who' can be used as a subject and also as an object pronoun.

I'm afraid the other formulation of the sentence is not grammatically correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, SonuKumar, Re-writing the sentence in the way which you've put it is wrong. And nowadays, it's better to use "who" rather than "whom"
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Submitted by Imran 26 on Tue, 30/01/2018 - 07:08

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Hello Sir, Kindly let me know which is the correct preposition in below sentences: 1- I am getting inside the car. 2- I am getting into the car. please also send me the link at this site for preposition section.