Possessives: pronouns

Level: beginner

Subject Object Possessive adjective Possessive pronoun
I me  my mine
you you your yours
he him  his his
she her  her hers
it it its -
we us  our ours
they them  their theirs

 

Be careful!

Possessive pronouns do not have an apostrophe:

Is that car yours/hers/ours/theirs?
(NOT Is that car your's/her's/our's/their's?)

We can use a possessive pronoun instead of a full noun phrase to avoid repeating words:

Is that John's car?
     No, it's mine.
 (NOT No, it's [my car].)

Whose coat is this?
     Is it yours? (NOT Is it [your coat]?)

Her coat is grey.
     Mine is brown. (NOT [My coat] is brown.)

 

Possessives: pronouns 1

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Level: intermediate

We can use possessive pronouns and nouns after of. We can say:

Susan is one of my friends. > Susan is a friend of mine.
(NOT Susan is a friend of me.)

I am one of Susan's friends. > I am a friend of Susan's.
(NOT I am a friend of Susan.)

Possessives: pronouns 2

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Hi Knightrider,

I can't think of any special use of the double possessive with a derogatory meaning. Depending on the intonation, it certainly could be used to communicate this, but as far as I can think, it doesn't have anything to do with the double possessive structure itself.

Similarly, 'what promise is it of yours?' sounds quite odd, even non-standard, to me. Perhaps if I saw it in context it would sound more natural to me. The second question there is grammatically correct and means what you indicate in your last full paragraph.

I hope this helps you.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by annkec on Sat, 25/10/2014 - 13:09

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You have made a mistake in the table above. In the column ''Possessives adjectives'' should be written ''hers'' not ''her''. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Hello annkec,

Thanks, but 'her' is a possessive adjective - 'hers' is a possessive pronoun.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by PamNa on Mon, 08/09/2014 - 12:59

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How can you say you're a fan of someone? Fox example, "I am a fan of Girls' Generation"..Is it correct? Or should I say "I am a fan of Girls' Generation's", following the example above "I am a friend of Susan's" ?

Hello PamNa,

Language evolves in unexpected ways and this is a good example of how the language has evolved. When using people's names in this kind of phrase the 's is common (though it is possible to say 'of Susan' too). However, when talking about other things, including groups, teams and so on, we do not use 's. For example:

I'm a fan of Frank Sinatra. [correct]

I'm a fan of Frank Sinatra's. [correct]

I'm a fan of Manchester United. [correct]

I'm a fan of Manchester United's. [incorrect]

Note that sometimes the choice can change the meaning, with certain phrases. For example:

That's a photo of Susan. [she is in the picture]

That's a photo of Susan's. [it belongs to her]

I hope that helps to clarify it for you. It's an interesting and tricky area - thank you for the question!

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Andhrite on Mon, 18/08/2014 - 17:31

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Is it ' Same school as me' or 'Same school as myne' Thank you.

Hello Andhrite,

You can say both 'as me' and 'as mine' but I think 'as me' is the more common.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Poncia on Wed, 23/07/2014 - 10:27

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hello but you can not see the right answers and understand mistakes made?

Hello Poncia,

To see the correct answers, click on the Finish button. If you don't understand an answer, please feel free to ask about it here in the Comments.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by janith maduranga on Tue, 22/07/2014 - 07:26

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Hello Everyone!@#

Submitted by platformreg on Fri, 18/07/2014 - 09:21

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As for "whose coat is this", can I say "whose is this coat"? Is there any difference between the two? To my knowledge, "whose" is often followed by a noun, but there are also circumstances that "whose" are not followed by a noun. I am wondering when "whose" could not be followed by a noun. For example, in relative clauses, noun clauses? Thank you very much!

Hi platformreg,

'whose' can be both a possessive question word (both adjective and pronoun, e.g. in the example questions you write above, which are both correct; there is little difference between them) as well as a relative pronoun. In general, when 'whose' is a possessive adjective or relative pronoun, it is followed by a noun. I'd say that more often than not, 'whose' is followed by a noun, though I'd have to do a bit of research in a corpus to confirm that.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by nghiabkhn on Wed, 25/06/2014 - 03:50

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Hello teacher. you can speak to me "how use possessives and object in the test" you know after transitive + object.after possessive +N. but in the test of me " transitive+....+N".i can't do exactly.Thank you

Hello nghiabkhn,

I'm afraid I'm not at all sure what you mean.  Could you perhaps provide some example sentences, and ask about them?  That would help to clarify what you mean and then we will be happy to try to help you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish team

Submitted by cristianavk on Tue, 10/06/2014 - 10:00

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Does the pronoun 'mine' have a plural form? All the examples given are singular. Thank you.

Hello cristianavk,

Good question! The answer is no - mine is used for to refer to both singular and plural nouns.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by HNawar on Mon, 07/04/2014 - 10:40

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Dears, Is it correct to confirm that I got it : 1- This is my book 2- This book is mine 3- It's mine ( 's ) refer to Book. my at the first sentence is possessive adjectives mine at the second is possessive pronoun that is the correct using of them ? BR,

Submitted by HNawar on Mon, 07/04/2014 - 10:22

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Hi Team, Hope all is well ! 1st : I just need to know why we couldn't use " I am a friend of Susan " ? however the meaning is clear .. 2nd : I am a friend of Susan's ... in this sentence " 'S " refer to what ? Thanks,

Hi HNawar,

It's possible to say "I'm a friend of Susan", but it's more common to say "I'm a friend of Susan's". This is just the way English has evolved - I wouldn't try to analyse it too much. But if it helps, perhaps you could think of it as short form of "I'm a friend of Susan's (many friends)."

Regarding your 3 sentences above, they are correct (the third is "It's mine"). They are possessive adjectives in sentences 1 and 2, and it's a possessive pronoun in sentence 3.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

 

Submitted by sdgnour2014 on Sat, 22/03/2014 - 09:55

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Hello teacher, I understand that the possessive pronoun mine can stand alone. Also I understand that I can use the possessive noun after the preposition (of). Is it the same with the possessive yours? Please correct the following sentences: 1- This is mine and this is yours. 2- This idea is yours not of mine. 3- Ali and Osman are friends of yours not of mine. 4- I can choose yours.

Hi sdgnour2014,

mine and yours are used in the same way syntactically. In number 2 below, the word "of" is not needed, just as it is not needed before "yours". In number 3 below, the word "of" is often omitted since it is already understood.

1. This is mine and that is yours.
2. This idea is yours, not mine.
3. Ali and Osman are friends of yours, not (of) mine.
4. (correct)

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by sdgnour2014 on Wed, 19/03/2014 - 15:40

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Hello teacher, is it right to say? 1- Ahmed is my friend. 2- Ahmed is a friend of mine. 3- Ahmed is one of my friends. 4- Ahmed and Ali are two friends of mine. 5- Ahmed and Ali and Osman are three friends of me.

Hello sdgnour2014,

The first four are correct, the last one is not.  Instead of 'me' in the last sentence you need 'mine'.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by iphie on Fri, 14/03/2014 - 16:13

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Hello Mr. Kirk, Below are some of the sentence: 1. On one occasion he beats me up on the process dislocate mine finger. 2. Mine has changed to yellow 3. Her bag is in the car, mine is here. 4. Since this year I’ve not set my eyes on him. 5. I need to get my car from the mechanic. 6. Bring my phone for me.

Hello iphie,

In sentence 1, my finger is the correct form. mine usually stands alone, without a noun (in this case, finger) with it. By the way, this sentence would probably best be written in the simple past: "On one occasion, he beat me up, in the process dislocating my finger." I hope that this sentence doesn't explain a personal experience.

Your other sentences all look good - good work!

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by iphie on Fri, 07/03/2014 - 12:31

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Please I'll like to know when to use my and mine in sentence. Thank you.

Hello iphie,

The third pair of sentences in the exercise nicely illustrates the use of my and mine. There's also an example in the second table above.

Why don't you write a couple of sentences with these words and then we can check them for you?

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ye gyi on Sat, 01/03/2014 - 06:29

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May I ask you a question. I'm not well familiar with writing. To write about myself, the headline should be 'Myself' or 'My Self'. I hope you will answer me. :)

Hi ye gyi,

I'd suggest looking up myself and self in the dictionary (see the handy Cambridge Dictionaries Online search box on the right) and comparing them. Of these two options, I'd suggest myself as the title of a composition about you, or perhaps even better, "About me".

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ye gyi on Wed, 26/02/2014 - 16:02

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Where can I get a pdf file for English Grammar?Plz, Cauze i want to read offline.

Hello ye gyi,

The pdfs on LearnEnglish are for pages with audio or video recordings, so users can see the transcript and the exercises on paper.  We don't make pdfs for the other pages.  You could, however, do a screen grab or screen print if you need a paper copy.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by zen29 on Mon, 10/02/2014 - 13:08

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hi,can you please give me examples of "its"as possessive-pronoun and adjective!

Hello zen29,

Here is an example of its used like an adjective: The jury has reached its decision. In theory, its can also function as a possessive pronoun, but to be honest, I can't think of a sentence which sounds natural with it. A similar sentence would be: That bicycle is hers. The word hers could in theory be replaced by its if the subject were a thing or animal (e.g. That bicycle is its. (referring, for example, to a robot) but it sounds wrong to me.

I hope this helps!

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by waleed mubarak on Tue, 21/01/2014 - 05:53

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thank you very very much about everything on here 

   really I can't thank about what do you progress for teaching

Submitted by Nat17 on Tue, 05/11/2013 - 16:31

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Great! ;) Thanks fot these exercises :)

Submitted by zaccyear on Mon, 28/10/2013 - 12:16

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wow interesting...

Submitted by bpesut68 on Fri, 11/10/2013 - 09:38

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Can You give me a answers?

Submitted by e0j on Mon, 08/07/2013 - 19:17

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When the man asked me how I had got ---- address, I told him that I was given it by a relative of ----.

 his / his
 his / him
him / him

which option is correct? plz help ..

Hi e0j,

The third person masculine possessive adjective and possessive pronoun are the same word: his.

Therefore, his is the correct word for both of the gaps in the sentence you shared.

Best wishes,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ajithkaroort on Mon, 17/06/2013 - 06:59

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From where can i get the correct answer for the exercise???

Hello ajithkaroort,

If you click 'Finish' then you will see the correct answers (as well as your score).

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by vinitasheel on Sat, 08/06/2013 - 14:26

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Hello,

This is a message for site administrator. In fact, I have already asked on another page but I wonder if somebody reads this messages.

On my first lesson, I saw the exercises. But since then, I haven't seen them on any of the lessons even on that first one.

Kindlly help.

Vinita

Hello Vinita,


I’m sorry you’re having problems with the exercises. I’ll try to help you, but I’ll need a little more information, so I have a few questions for you:

- On which page did the exercises work for you?
- Do the exercises still work on this page?
- On which pages don’t the exercises work?
- Can you see videos and games on the site?
- Which browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome etc.) are you using? Did you use a different browser the first time you visited LearnEnglish?

Once we have this information we’ll look at the pages and see where the problem might be.


Best wishes,


Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by musiklärare Al… on Sun, 26/05/2013 - 21:26

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Hi all

I will take the example which we have in  in test-exercise regarding my question.`

`That is your room and that is her room.``

Correct answer is:``This is your room and that is hers.``

Why is that incorrect: ``This is your room and that is hers room.``

In all Slavic languages , and maybe some other, noun  take the place after possessive pronounce...hers room...which means that she owns the room.Why in English can not use noun after pronounce in such way ?

I hope someone can explain me,

Best regards,

Alexandra

Hello Alexandra,

In English we have both possessive adjectives (used with nouns) and possessive pronouns (used by themselves).  For example, we can say:

This is her room (my + noun)

or

This is hers (without a noun)

So as you can see, nouns can follow them, but you need to make sure you use the right kind of possessive marker:

my / your / his / her / its / our / their + noun

mine / yours / his / hers / its / ours / theirs without a noun

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

 

Submitted by Abdulrahman112 on Wed, 08/05/2013 - 06:45

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Hi,

The lesson is very difficult

Submitted by torontolast on Thu, 02/05/2013 - 10:02

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Why I cannot use "No, It's not my car"

Hello torontolast!

 

Who said you can't use that? The only mistake I can see is the capital I on its.

 

Regards

 

Jeremy Bee

The LearnEnglish Team

Of course, you can. But, which one do you prefer? 

- No, it is my car

-No, it's mine.

I guess you would prefer the short one.