Adverbials

Adverbials

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Submitted by anie1 on Sun, 10/11/2019 - 07:07

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Hello, I would like to ask if the following is correct When there is a house that also has a garden can we say 1.It is a house with a big garden around it. Around it, suits well in the sentence? Thank you in advance
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Submitted by Peter M. on Sun, 10/11/2019 - 08:49

In reply to by anie1

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Hello agie,

That is fine, yes.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by anie1 on Tue, 24/09/2019 - 14:29

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Hello, I would like to ask if the following are correct. 1.They will help you learn fast ot they will help you learning fast? (maths, French etc) 2.They will help you learn quickly? 3.It is the top part of the story. (does this sentence make sense? Is it correct?) Thank you in advance
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Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 25/09/2019 - 08:32

In reply to by anie1

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Hello agie,

You can say 'help you learn' or 'help you to learn'. There is no difference in meaning.

'Help you learning' is not correct. You could say 'help you with your learning'.

 

We wouldn't say 'the top part of the story'. I'm not sure what you mean, but perhaps we would say 'the first part of the story' or 'the first paragraph of the story', or 'the beginning of the story'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Prap on Sat, 06/07/2019 - 07:32

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We were taught at school that 'every day' is a noun phrase which functions adverbially in a sentence but many grammar books say it is an adverbial phrase. I wanted to know what kind of phrase it is -- noun phrase or adverbial phrase.

Hello Prap

It can be both. A noun phrase can be used adverbially -- this is another way of saying that the noun phrase functions as an adverb in a sentence (in this case, for example, it can tell you more about the frequency of an action) -- and in that sense it is also an adverbial phrase.

I hope that helps you make sense of it.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Rafaela1 on Sun, 09/06/2019 - 13:11

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Some teachers say, "You're doing good" instead of "You're doing well". I'm wondering if both are acceptable? σ┃・ω・`*┃

Hello Rafaela1

Strictly speaking, 'well' is the correct form here, but people often use 'good' instead of 'well' in informal speech in a sentence like this.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Bonne on Sun, 09/06/2019 - 04:51

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I've got a fight left in me. Please analyse this sentence for me. Thank you in advance.

Hello Bonne,

I'm not sure what you mean by 'analyse' here. Is this a sentence which you've written and would like to know if it is correct, or a sentence you have found somewhere and which you don't understand?

If the sentence is yours, then we would need to know what you want to say in order to tell you if the sentence is OK or not. If the sentence is from somewhere else, then we would need to know the context before we comment on it.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Kisa Batool on Tue, 21/05/2019 - 14:08

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Hi ! I am confused about the part of speech "much" belongs to. "I didn't do much ." What is "much" here? Is it an adverbial qualifying 'do' or an object being indefinite pronoun?
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Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 22/05/2019 - 08:03

In reply to by Kisa Batool

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Hello Kisa Batool, The sentence can be interpreted in several ways but I would say that 'much' here is a pronoun which is the object of the verb 'do'. You can see a similar example on this page under 'pronoun, noun': https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/much ~ Peter The LearnEnglish Team
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Submitted by Rafaela1 on Mon, 20/05/2019 - 13:30

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I'm not quite sure the difference between these two sentences. He spoke angrily. He angrily spoke. Can somebody teache me? ʅ(´-ω-`)ʃ
Hi Rafaela1 Adverbials of manner like 'angrily' (https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar/adverbials-manner) almost always come after the verb and not before. Putting one before the verb is not exactly wrong, but it's so unusual that it would sound strange for you to use it in a normal situation. If you were writing a poem -- you've shared many very nice poems here on LearnEnglish and we are grateful! -- then it could be appropriate, but otherwise I'd recommend you use the first word order. All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by amirfd on Wed, 08/05/2019 - 12:40

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Hello. computers brought people closer together. computers brought people together closer. which one is correct? part of speech together?
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Submitted by Kirk Moore on Thu, 09/05/2019 - 06:33

In reply to by amirfd

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Hello amirfd The first one is correct. The words 'closer', the comparative form of the adjective 'close', and the adverb 'together' are collocates here -- see number 5 on https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/together . All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Adya's on Wed, 03/04/2019 - 07:55

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Hi Is it okay to say "They are ill from yesterday" to mean "They have been ill since yesterday"? What are the differential usages of 'for' in this particular sense? Regards
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Submitted by Kirk Moore on Wed, 03/04/2019 - 17:00

In reply to by Adya's

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Hello Adya's That sounds strange to me. Perhaps in some varieties of English or in some specific situation people would say it, but I don't think I ever would. I'm sorry, but I don't understand your question about 'for' -- I don't see the word 'for' in the phrases you ask about. All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by briskmusk on Fri, 25/01/2019 - 14:24

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I have a question on that sentence,>>>> "Although we've only just met, I feel like I've known you all my life." >>>>>>>> Why couldn't we say, "I feel as though/as if" instead of, "I feel like" ?? & thanks in advance. When I made it "as though", it's considered wrong in the exercise in here https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/intermediate-grammar/and

Hello briskmusk,

Both 'as though' and 'as if' are possible here and have the same meaning as 'like'.

The exercise asks for either 'as' or 'like', however, not a two-word answer.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lal on Mon, 26/11/2018 - 04:59

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Hi Kirk Thank you for your prompt reply regarding 'compound nouns' I also referred to Cambridge Dictionary. It was very useful but I have a question regarding Noun + Noun e.g. shopkeeper, website , 'car park' - this also noun + noun we don't write it together like the two other two I have mentioned e.g. carpark' and many other e.g. like adjectice + noun blackberry, blackboard, but 'black belt' , not 'blackbelt' My question: Is there any rule or way to learn whether to write compound nouns together or seperately e.g. 'black belt' blackberry, website, car park? Please let me know. Thank you. Regards Lal
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Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 26/11/2018 - 07:29

In reply to by Lal

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Hi Lal,

I'm afraid there is no way to tell this in advance. You simply have to memorise each item. Compound nouns can change their spelling over time as well, so an item may begin as two separate words but over time (many years) may become one word.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lal on Mon, 26/11/2018 - 07:49

In reply to by Peter M.

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Hi Peter, Thank you very much for your prompt reply regarding 'compound nouns.' Now it is clear. Regards Lal

Submitted by Lal on Sat, 24/11/2018 - 08:25

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Hello Sir Please help me to understand this e.g. courtship, courtyard, courtroom etc. We call this compound nouns . I am I correct? Addition of two nouns but not all some nouns are not-- they are seperated. e.g. crash helmet, credit card, credit note, but 'cowboy' why is this difference? Or tell me how can I know when to add the nouns and when not as mentioned above in my examples. Thank you. Lal
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Submitted by Kirk Moore on Sat, 24/11/2018 - 18:26

In reply to by Lal

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Hi Lal,

'courtship' is not a compound noun, since '-ship' is a suffix rather than a noun in this case, but the others you mention could be considered compound nouns. Please see this Cambridge Dictionary page for an introduction to this topic. If you have any specific questions after that, please let us know.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Thu, 22/11/2018 - 19:09

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Could you help me, please? Is "breathe" means "take in air"? Thank you.

Hello Ahmed,

Yes, 'breathe' means to draw in air through your mouth or nose. If we stop doing this for any more than a short time we die!

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Fri, 02/11/2018 - 21:41

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Could you help me, please? Which preposition should I use, "of" or "about" or both of them are correct? What is the difference in meaning? I often think ....... the time we spent in Rome that I can't forget. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

Generally, we use 'think of' to mean 'imagine' or 'dream of' and 'think about' to mean 'consider'. Both can be used when we are remembering something in a nostalgic way, and I think in your example both forms are possible.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nisala Jayasuriya on Fri, 28/09/2018 - 00:32

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Hi Kirk, I benefitted from competitons that have been organized by this club over the years. I benefitted from competitons that which organized by this club over the years.
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Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 28/09/2018 - 06:41

In reply to by Nisala Jayasuriya

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Hi Nisala Jayasuriya,

I can see the two sentences but I don't see a question! What would you like to ask us?

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by amol on Sat, 15/09/2018 - 06:31

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What is the rule of definite article THE for superlative form of adverb? John runs the fastest of all. Or John runs fastest of all.

Hello amol,

The superlative usually has a definite article before it unless there is a possessive adjective (my/your etc).

There are some cases in which the article is optional and some in which it should not be used.

When the superlative comes before a noun, the article is needed:

He is the best player.

not

He is best player.

 

When a superlative adjective is in the predicative position, meaning it comes after rather than before the noun and follows a verb, it can be omitted, especially in informal use:

Dark chocolate is the best.

or

Dark chocolate is best.

 

The same is true of superlative adverbs:

He worked the hardest.

or

He worked hardest.

 

When the superlative is in the predicative position and you are compare the same thing in different situations you should not use an article:

He works hardest in the morning when he is fresh.

not

He works the hardest in the morning when he is fresh.

 

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by amol on Sat, 15/09/2018 - 06:29

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Should we use much or very as an adverb of degree to describe V3 used as a verb? Q. The police was much / very criticised.

Hello amol,

We would use 'very' in this sentence.

We use 'much' to modify verbs in negatives and questions, so you could say these:

Were the police criticised much?

I don't think the police were criticised much.

'Much' usually comes after the verb rather than before it.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by amol on Sat, 15/09/2018 - 06:21

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Which adverb (much/very) is to be used when V3 is used as an adjective? 1. He is very / much satisfied. 2. I felt very / much tired.

Hello amol,

The correct word here is 'very'. We use 'much' to modify comparative adjectives (much bigger, much more beautiful) but not to modify adjectives.

 

There are two exceptions is in a certain type of informal/slang question:

Person A yawns.

Person B: Tired much?

 

As I said, this is a non-standard use.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nisala Jayasuriya on Wed, 12/09/2018 - 07:00

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Hi Kirk Actually I was busy with lots of things happening around me Actually I was busy with lots of things were happening around me Which one is correct
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Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 13/09/2018 - 07:08

In reply to by Nisala Jayasuriya

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Hi Nisala Jayasuriya,

The first sentence is correct; the second is not.

The first sentence uses the -ing form as part of a participle clause. You can read more about these on this page.

The second sentence is not correct. You could add a relative pronoun ('which' or 'that'):

Actually I was busy with lots of things which were happening around me

Alternatively you could have two sentences:

Actually I was busy. Lots of things were happening around me.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nisala Jayasuriya on Tue, 11/09/2018 - 11:47

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Two players got injured while feilding on muddy surface Is this statement correct

Hi Nisala,

That works, though please note that 'fielding' is misspelt and that some kind of article (either 'a' or 'the') should be used before 'muddy surface'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Goncharush on Thu, 09/08/2018 - 15:16

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Hi, What is the correct way to use *last* in this sentence? 1.The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. She was last seen on Monday, 22 July. Or 2. The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. Last time, she was seen on Monday, 22 July.
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Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 10/08/2018 - 07:13

In reply to by Goncharush

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Hi Goncharush,

The first sentence is correct and is the best option stylistically, in my view.

If you wanted to use 'last time' then you could say:

The police are seaching for Liza Morgan. The last time she was seen was on Monday, 22 July.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by amol on Fri, 13/07/2018 - 07:49

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Hello, 'much',as an adverb, is used with past participle The sentence - "She is very tired after a day's work." Is the above sentence correct? Can we use much instead of very?
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Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 13/07/2018 - 09:16

In reply to by amol

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Hello amol,

Much as an adverb is most often used before comparative adjectives: much better, much easier.

It can be used with superlative adjectives: much the best, much the easiest.

With past participles it is used quite rarely. It tends to be seen in more formal texts and usually only in certain expresssions: much loved, much needed, much changed. It cannot be used in place of very in most expressions.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by David240350 on Mon, 09/07/2018 - 17:21

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Can you tell me which is correct? I've just woke up I've just woken up thanks

Hi David,

The second one is correct. If you changed the first one to 'I just woke up', it would be correct, though more natural in American English than in British English.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by sujit kumar on Thu, 05/07/2018 - 13:24

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hello Sir, can you help me to clear my doubt how to use might have/could have.. I might have been hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way. I could have been hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way. Which one is right w.r.t might have/could have.
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Submitted by Kirk Moore on Thu, 05/07/2018 - 18:16

In reply to by sujit kumar

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Hi sujit kumar,

'might have' and 'could have' can both be used to talk about a possible action in the past with little or no difference in meaning. Your sentence is well-formed grammatically, but I wouldn't recommend saying 'might have' or 'could have' here because the last part ('luckily I just managed to get out of the way') shows that you were nearly hit. In other words, 'might have' and 'could have' suggest that it was possible in a theoretical way, whereas the last part of your sentence that it wasn't just theoretical -- it nearly happened.

What I'd recommend instead is something like 'I was nearly hit by a car, but luckily I just managed to get out of the way' or 'I might have been hit by a car but luckily was not'.

I hope this helps you make sense of it.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lal on Fri, 22/06/2018 - 05:45

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Dear Sir This question is under puntuation. Can we use a full stop after a phrase e.g. Oh good. where did you find it? There is a full stop after 'good'. Is it all right? Regards Thank you.