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A class forum

Learn how to write a post on a class forum.

Do the preparation task first. Then read the text and tips and do the exercises.

Preparation

Reading text

Add your comment below:

So cool to read about everyone's home tradition they miss the most! I'm from England but I've been living in the States for five years and the thing I miss the most is Bonfire Night on November 5th.

The best thing about Bonfire Night is the fireworks, oh, and the bonfires! … and the history behind it. Basically, Guy Fawkes and his friends tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament and kill King James I. They nearly did it too – they hired a room under the House of Parliament and filled it with explosives. But someone told the royal palace. The authorities found Guy Fawkes in the room guarding the explosives, and he was sentenced to torture and death.

So it's a tradition that celebrates the fact that the king survived. It also means people don't forget what happens if you plot against your country. There's a kind of poem about it that starts 'Remember, remember the fifth of November, gunpowder, treason and plot.' That's why we build a 'guy' – a life-size model of Guy Fawkes – and burn it on the bonfire. Pretty dark and horrible when you think about it!

Tips

  1. It's nice to start by saying something that shows you have read other people's posts.
  2. In a class forum you can be quite informal.
  3. In informal writing you can sometimes miss out the beginning of a phrase:
    So cool to read about everyone's home tradition ...
  4. Remember, in a forum you are part of a long conversation with a lot of other people so they might ask you questions.

Discussion

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Submitted by Ayzhan on Thu, 06/02/2020 - 16:26

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Hello everyone! I am from Kazakhstan. Most of all I like Nauruz celebrating In our country. every year spring we visit each other and to wish helthy to each other. And in the centre of the each town of our country we build yurts, where everybody can taste our national meal

Submitted by Nwe Oo Mon on Thu, 06/02/2020 - 11:51

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It's so nice to read about about the diversity of traditions around the world.I'm from Myanmar and I live in Yagon. In my country, there are many traditional festivals such as Thingyan , Waso , Thadingyut , Thasoungmyone ,etc.Among those, Thingyan festival is the biggest festival in Myanmar. It is also called Water festival or Myanmar New year. It usually takes place for 4 days and some year it takes place 5 days.We pour water each other and we donate foods and do good deeds in those day. We clean the house , Monastery and Pagodas. During the festival, we get public long holidays. In the first day of new year's morning , we go to the nearest pagodas after that to pray for the whole new year.

Submitted by huyentran on Wed, 05/02/2020 - 00:17

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Hi. I’m from Vietnam. In my country, we have many tradition but the thing i like best is family gathering at mid autumn festival tradition. On this occasion, people are returning home and meeting their relatives. they will eat family meal and talk to each other. The children will receive other. The children will receive the Mid-Autumn Festival. It will be very exciting and happy. In particular, we have moon cakes - a cake in the Mid-Autumn Festival and we can say that Mid-Autumn Festival is not a Mid-Autumn Festival without moon cake.

Submitted by Bao Ton on Mon, 27/01/2020 - 13:20

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Hi. I'm from Vietnam and I want to tell you about our tradition festival, which called "Tet". It's same as New Year in Western, but this is Lunar New Year in our country. We do many things in these days. Before Tet, we have to clean house and all objects in the house such as table, chair, wall, floor, etc. Then we will clean kitchen and buy goldfish to worship Mr.Cong & Mr.Tao (they are kitchen Gods) back to heaven. Then we will pack "Banh Chung" before New Year Eve so we can eat them during Tet. In the first day of New Year's morning, we often go exodus (go out of the house on appropriate direction of age) to hope for luck and best things will come. Most of us will come to the nearest pagoda after that to pray for New Year.

Submitted by Mau on Fri, 24/01/2020 - 14:47

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It's so nice to hear about the diversity of traditions you have in your countries. I'm from Bolivia and today, like every 24th January, we celebrate Alasitas, the Abundance Festival. A month long fair begins in La Paz, where you can buy miniature versions of whatever you desire to achieve this year. For instance, you might want to buy a house, so you could get a tiny house, a big building or a car. There are even little university degree tittles and marriage certificates. After their purchase, people pray to Ekeko, the god of abundance, with the hope he will bring fortune and abundance to your life. It might sound quite bizarre but there's a very colourful environment.

Submitted by Maksim on Thu, 23/01/2020 - 19:46

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Hi! I'm from Russia, and I'm not a religious person, but I'd like to tell you about the orthodox holiday Epiphany. There is an interesting but sometimes extreme tradition to dive into the ice water late at night.

Submitted by mariy on Thu, 23/01/2020 - 18:35

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Hi everyone It is fascinating to read about diversity of traditions around the world. I'm from Iran and I've been living in Poland. one of the biggest celebrations in Iran is called "Yalda". Yalda means birth and comes from Zoroastrianism era. we celebrate the longest night of the year. Yalda night begins from the last evening of autumn until passed midnight. In this night we get to gather with our families and friends and eat fruits, nuts, drink and read poetry (Hafez). we pass the whole night with laughter and joy. The most important fruits of this night are pomegranate and watermelon, The red color in these fruits symbolizes cycle and glow of life. As I mentioned, during this night people also read Hafez poetry and each member of the family makes a wish and randomly opens the book and asks the eldest member of the family to read it aloud. Totally we spend amazing time in that night with our family.

Submitted by Mozart Aung on Fri, 17/01/2020 - 17:26

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I'm from Myanmar and I really enjoy participating in every occasion of our country. But the moment that I most excited is celebrating our water festival (we called Thingyan here). We pour water each other, we donate foods and do good deeds in those days. It takes 4 days long and we got public holidays at that time.

Submitted by Diego Pacanchique on Tue, 14/01/2020 - 23:42

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Hi everyone, I read almost three comments about the traditional celebration and all are funny. I am from Colombia where we have many festivals such as el Carnaval de Barranquilla, el Carnaval de negros y Blancos, la feria de Cali, etc. Those festivals represent Colombia traditions because there are different dances, types of music and many happines.