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So cool to read about everyone's home tradition they miss the most! I'm from England but I've been living in the States for five years and the thing I miss the most is Bonfire Night on November 5th.

The best thing about Bonfire Night is the fireworks, oh, and the bonfires! … and the history behind it. Basically, Guy Fawkes and his friends tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament and kill King James I. They nearly did it too – they hired a room under the House of Parliament and filled it with explosives. But someone told the royal palace. The authorities found Guy Fawkes in the room guarding the explosives, and he was sentenced to torture and death.

So it's a tradition that celebrates the fact that the king survived. It also means people don't forget what happens if you plot against your country. There's a kind of poem about it that starts 'Remember, remember the fifth of November, gunpowder, treason and plot.' That's why we build a 'guy' – a life-size model of Guy Fawkes – and burn it on the bonfire. Pretty dark and horrible when you think about it!

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    So cool to read about everyone's home tradition ...
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Average: 5 (1 vote)

Submitted by Edvair Moreira on Wed, 14/10/2020 - 20:57

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Pretty nice to hear about different cultures around the world. I’m from Brazil and one tradition that I like best in my country is called “Festa Junina” that translated into English would be something like June Party. Basically, it's a kind of redneck party to celebrate the life of São João, who is considered by some people as a holy man. The best thing at this party are the typical foods, and the majority of these foods are made with corn, each one with their particular flavor, and I love it. Besides, there are some games during this party, such as wedding simulation, live music, and typical dances. Although the origin of this party has been from the northeast of the country, it’s celebrated in all states of Brazil, and it is something that I love in my country. We are people with a lot of cultural diversity, but at the same time, we are able to share each regional culture among other states.

Submitted by Nelisa Alcalde on Wed, 14/10/2020 - 15:38

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I'm so impressed by all the traditions around the world, thanks for sharing. I'm from Spain but I now live in the UK. There are many different traditions in my country depending on the region you are in. I'm from a small village in Cordoba which is an Andalusian's city. On the 3rd of May we celebrated "las cruces de Mayo" which is basically a religious celebration. Every neighbourhood on the village and also in Cordoba are in charge of building a cross made by carnations most of them red. I'm not a religious person but I enjoyed that celebration in particular. I remember when I was a kid, everyone in my area was working together building a cross made by flowers, can you imagine that? It was great to see everyone working together. People with different ideals and backgrounds collaborating in the same project. I think this is something that, unfortunately, we don't picture so often in a neighbourhood.

Submitted by Dongleeosaki on Wed, 07/10/2020 - 12:26

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hello, it's cool to know about every traditions in many countries. here im tell you a tradition in Indonesia. in one a year, every women in indonesia will celebrate Kartini day to commerate the birthday of Kartini. Then, who's Kartini? Kartini is a royal woman who is being a role model for feminism in Indonesia. They usually wear traditional dress from various province in Indonesia.

Submitted by OhmaTokita on Wed, 07/10/2020 - 03:39

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Hello, everyone. It's really nice reading about different tradition around the world. I'm living in Belgium. To be honest with you I don't have any traditions to share even if we have plenty of them here. But it was a pleisure to read about yours.

Submitted by Anna_maria on Mon, 05/10/2020 - 22:11

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Hi everyone, it's cool that on all the world people have their traditions and days which celebrate. I from Poland, we have a lot of holidays but certainly no more than in other countries. It's hard to choose which holiday is the best. Every day is different and that's beautiful. During every holiday we can spend time with our families what's important for me. Otherwise I think in that time people are nicer and able to help. Kisses, A.

Submitted by Up on Mon, 05/10/2020 - 19:44

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Hi everyone, I am from Lithuania. Nice to read yours traditions' stories. I have found very interesting stories, which I never heard before. So in Lithuania we have a spring festival we call that festival "Užgavinės" in English language are known like "the time before Lent". We celebrate this festival seven weeks before Easter. Main ritual is the battle between Winter's shaman(Lašinins eng. "FAT") and Spring's shaman (Kanapinis eng. "Cannabis"). Spring's shaman always wins and after that we burn "FAT" shaman on bonfire. To this event people likes to take homemade pancakes and biscuits during the festival they share food with other festival's guests. In summary, this festival simbolize the coming of spring and ending of winter.

Submitted by César Alejandro on Thu, 01/10/2020 - 21:08

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Hi everyone My best regards for you, I would like to share one of the most popular traditions in Mexico, the day of the death. The story of this tradition begins with the idea of the death by our ancestors, but first I have to mention that I don't know the story well, so I may be mistaken in some parts. Back to the story, our ancestors believed that death was something kind of "beautiful", like the next life, and that an specific day in the year all the deaths had the chance to visit their loved ones, this day was stablished to be on November 2nd. Some people say that the "gates" of the underworld were opened even a day before, that is November 1st, and this was specially for kids and people that hadn't had family. But from my knowledge I didn't know about it.

Submitted by Ugulhan on Tue, 29/09/2020 - 13:35

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I am from Uzbekistan and I have been living for fifteen years in Germany. We have a wonderful home tradition in March. We'll celebrate on 21 March Navruz day. The best thing about Navruz is the meal sumalak, that is a delicious sweetness! and history behind it is amazing. Basically, the tribes of Zardusht was tried to prepare the great meal in spring and brought a big pot filled with white ground wheat, water, and flour. They nearly prepared all ingredients too- they hung the pot above the fire but they were asleep and it was boiled until the morning by seven angels. Early morning the people of tribes had been seen a wonderful sweet meal.
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Submitted by danisep on Fri, 25/09/2020 - 00:35

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This country, Colombia has a lot of religious traditions, I don’t remember one that isn’t. Nowaday I don't have one special tradition, but when I was kid my favorite tradition was christmas presents, foods and share time with the family was great nowaday it is not the same, also its true that every year in colombia on december 31st we build a doll fill of fireworks that represent all that bad things that happened in the last year and we want to left behind at the end of this year people are gonna explode a huge doll.