Adverbials

Adverbials are words that we use to give more information about a verb. They can be one word (angrily, here) or phrases (at home, in a few hours) and often say how, where, when or how often something happens or is done, though they can also have other uses.

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how adverbials are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Submitted by chandini on Thu, 06/02/2014 - 06:24

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Hello, Would you please tell me the difference between "lot" and "lots"? When shall we use lot and when shall we use lots? There is lot of work to do. Lots of people think so. Let me know the difference.

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 06/02/2014 - 08:05

In reply to by chandini

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Hello again chandini,

a lot of and lots of are synonyms, i.e. they mean the same thing. You can learn more about them and other similar words on our quantifiers page.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Vidyaarthi on Thu, 21/11/2013 - 17:00

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Sir,

He cut short his visit.

Her hair was cut short.

Isn't 'short' adverb in both the sentences?

Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 22/11/2013 - 14:15

In reply to by Vidyaarthi

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Hello Vidyaarthi,

'Short' is indeed an adverb in both sentences.  In the first sentence it forms part of a phrasal verb 'cut short' with an idiomatic meaning; in the second it is an adverb modifying the verb 'cut'.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by zagrus on Sun, 10/11/2013 - 16:10

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Hello, which sentence is correct : What should a person say when he loses a close relative or friend? What should a person say when he loses a close relative or a close friend?

Submitted by Peter M. on Thu, 14/11/2013 - 12:19

In reply to by zagrus

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Hello zagrus,

Both sentences are correct.  In English we often miss out words which are repeated in the sentence - such as 'close' in your sentence - because it makes the sentence simpler and, often, more elegant.  The name for this is 'ellipsis'.  I would say the first sentence is a little more stylish, but both sentences are perfectly correct.  Or, to put it another way:

You can use either the first (sentence) or the second sentence; both are correct.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by lexeus on Mon, 04/11/2013 - 08:30

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Hi, I'm studying end-position adverbials from a course book. Could you please identify the adverbials in the following sentences? What did John do yesterday? He played baseball. What is Mary going to do tomorrow? She is going to go to school. What did Tom and Peter do last Saturday? They went to the movies. What are the girls going to do next Saturday? They are going to swim in the sea. What is Mimi going to do tonight? She is going to do her homework. Thanks.

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 07/11/2013 - 07:22

In reply to by lexeus

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Hi lexeus,

The adverbials in the questions you wrote are all adverbials of time: yesterday, tomorrow, last Saturday, next Saturday and tonight. In the answers, the phrases that specify location (e.g., to school, to the movies and in the sea) are also adverbials.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Vidyaarthi on Wed, 23/10/2013 - 17:51

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I was fairly comfortable with English till I started studying grammar! In the sentence, 'She came home early.' , are both 'home' and 'early' adverbs? (place and time) In 'Bring the books here.', 'here' is an adverb, isn't it?
Hello Vidyaarthi, 'Home' is a difficult one, because it can be a noun, a transitive verb, an intransitive verb, an adjective or an adverb! In this example, you are correct: it is an adverb. Similarly, 'early' can be both an adverb and an adjective; here, as you say, it is an adverb. 'Here' can have several roles in the sentence but is usually an adverb, as it is in the sentence you provide. I hope that answers your question - though I think you had the answers yourself already! Best wishes, Peter The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by MayelaM on Mon, 09/09/2013 - 02:18

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Hi,  what of the following expressions is grammatically correct:  Not of my knowledge or Not to my knowledge?  Thanks.

Hello MayelaM!

 

Not to my knowledge is the correct version of the phrase. If you want to check phrases like that, one quick way of doing it is to enter the phrase with quotation marks ("...") into Google. Take a look at the first page of results for each phrase, and that will often give you an idea of which one is better.

 

Regards

 

Jeremy Bee

The LearnEnglish Team

"look at here"vs "look at me"

"keep it coming " vs "keep coming"

and also while in taxi how can i say to driver if i want him to keep driving slowly and stay on the left or near to kerb

could you please clear my doubt ?

 

Hello vnods,

'Look at me' means what it says: that the listener should look at the speaker.

'Look at here' is incorrect.  Perhaps you mean 'look over here', which means 'look at this place' (where the speaker is).

 

'Keep coming' means 'continue moving towards me'.  'Keep it coming' means 'continue giving me (something)'.

 

In the taxi I would probably say something like 'keep to the side and drive slowly'.

 

I hope those answers help you.

Best wishes,


Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for the suggestion... Google does not offer the results as a grammatical explanation... Any good online dictionary or similar e-book you may suggest to me?  I would like to review prepositions using phrases... 

Hello Mayela,

Jeremy is suggesting that you use Google to answer your original question (which form is correct?), not to find an explanation. However, you should be able to work out the meaning of the phrase from the words in it (it's not an idiom) and from looking at it in context once you've done the search.

Best wishes,

Adam

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by NikaDzindzibadze on Mon, 17/06/2013 - 15:46

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Thank you! It is really help me!

Submitted by challou on Fri, 17/05/2013 - 07:12

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Hi, I want to thank all of you for the efforts you are making to pass on your knowledge. My question is about the order of adjectives and precisely about general and specific opinion adjectives. For examples, nice is general but intelligent is specific. This is confusing specially for learners. Where can we find more to learn about this topic? Thanks

Hello challou!

 

Thanks for your kind words! In answer to your question, we actually have a page on adjective order. We're also expanding our grammar pages, so in the future, this will include more information and exercises.

 

Of course, the real problem for learners is learning to do this without thinking about it. This only comes with time, unfortunately, but doing plenty of reading and listening, so you get used to seeing the right word order, will help.

 

Regards

 

Jeremy Bee

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Emil123 on Sat, 11/05/2013 - 13:37

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Hello there, I'd like to ask you a question. I'm a little confused about the place of the adverb "still" in a sentence. Sometimes "still" doesn't stick to the rules as any other adverb. For example "I still don't know" or "I still can't believe" or "I still haven't been to Russia". In these cases "still" is not after the auxiliary or the modal verb like any other adverb. Could you please clarify why it is like this? Can I say "I don't still know" or "I can't still believe" as it should be if I stick to the rules about the place of the adverbs? Thank you!

Submitted by Ratheesh Mavandiyur on Sun, 03/03/2013 - 19:17

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I find your site really helpful. I am a visually impaired. I have got a question. It is like this

Q.   the patient has since been discharged. Does it require any improvement? The options given are

a)  ...has been since....

b)   ...since has been....

c)   ...is since discharged.

d) no improvement

Please help me. I have no one else to ask.

Hello Ratheesh,

This seems to be an exam question from the Engineering Services Examination and we don't really offer a service of answering that kind of question here. However, you're on the right page. 'Since' here is functioning as an adverb and it should go before the final part of the verb.

Best wishes,

Adam

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by JazyMG on Sat, 08/12/2012 - 23:25

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That´s obviously not what I meant...Why is this a probability adverbial? Shouldn't it be a manner one?

 

Submitted by Ratnani.Dipak on Wed, 24/10/2012 - 12:17

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such a good way to learn!please place some more example.

Submitted by jesurethinam s on Wed, 09/05/2012 - 02:42

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nice. very useful site

Submitted by maryoom25 on Fri, 13/04/2012 - 21:39

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Hi every body

 

easy and useful site

thanks

Submitted by sidra2011 on Fri, 23/03/2012 - 15:46

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I got 7 out of 8 :)

 

Submitted by ceciliapalacios on Sat, 17/03/2012 - 06:37

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I think this is a great site to learn and to practice. I have a question. What are the basic rules to use correctly conjunctions, prepositions and adverbs to contrast ideas correctly? thanks a lot!!

Submitted by okocha (not verified) on Thu, 15/03/2012 - 23:40

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it is very brief and useful