Participle clauses

Do you know how to use participle clauses to say information in a more economical way?

Look at these examples to see how participle clauses are used.

Looked after carefully, these boots will last for many years.
Not wanting to hurt his feelings, I avoided the question. 
Having lived through difficult times together, they were very close friends.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar test 1

Grammar B1-B2: Participle clauses: 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Participle clauses enable us to say information in a more economical way. They are formed using present participles (going, reading, seeing, walking, etc.), past participles (gone, read, seen, walked, etc.) or perfect participles (having gone, having read, having seen, having walked, etc.). 

We can use participle clauses when the participle and the verb in the main clause have the same subject. For example,

Waiting for Ellie, I made some tea. (While I was waiting for Ellie, I made some tea.)

Participle clauses do not have a specific tense. The tense is indicated by the verb in the main clause. 

Participle clauses are mainly used in written texts, particularly in a literary, academic or journalistic style. 

Present participle clauses

Here are some common ways we use present participle clauses. Note that present participles have a similar meaning to active verbs. 

  • To give the result of an action
    The bomb exploded, destroying the building.
  • To give the reason for an action
    Knowing she loved reading, Richard bought her a book.
  • To talk about an action that happened at the same time as another action
    Standing in the queue, I realised I didn't have any money.
  • To add information about the subject of the main clause
    Starting in the new year, the new policy bans cars in the city centre.

Past participle clauses

Here are some common ways that we use past participle clauses. Note that past participles normally have a passive meaning.

  • With a similar meaning to an if condition
    Used in this way, participles can make your writing more concise. (If you use participles in this way, … )
  • To give the reason for an action
    Worried by the news, she called the hospital.
  • To add information about the subject of the main clause
    Filled with pride, he walked towards the stage.

Perfect participle clauses

Perfect participle clauses show that the action they describe was finished before the action in the main clause. Perfect participles can be structured to make an active or passive meaning.

Having got dressed, he slowly went downstairs.
Having finished their training, they will be fully qualified doctors.
Having been made redundant, she started looking for a new job.

Participle clauses after conjunctions and prepositions

It is also common for participle clauses, especially with -ing, to follow conjunctions and prepositions such as before, after, instead of, on, since, when, while and in spite of.

Before cooking, you should wash your hands. 
Instead of complaining about it, they should try doing something positive.
On arriving at the hotel, he went to get changed.
While packing her things, she thought about the last two years.
In spite of having read the instructions twice, I still couldn’t understand how to use it.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar test 2

Grammar B1-B2: Participle clauses: 2

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Submitted by Nevı on Mon, 28/06/2021 - 10:03

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Hi superb team! I am writing to find out more about the pattern 'understand somebody doing something ' in the following sentence. - I can understand her wanting to live alone. - Here I am not sure whether participle clause 'wanting to live alone' is reduced relative clause. I would be grateful if you could explain which grammatical structure is that. Thank you in advance. Best wishes!

Hello Nevi,

I'd say that 'her wanting to live alone' is a noun phrase; it's the same structure as 'her desire to live alone'; that is, 'wanting' is a noun, just like 'desire' is.

Note that you could also say 'Her wanting to live alone is understandable' -- in this case, the clause is also a noun phrase plus the verb 'be' plus an adjective.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks a lot teacher. I wonder if 'wanting' is a gerund.

Hello Nevi,

Yes, 'wanting' is a gerund in this case.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks for your explanations,teacher. I really appreciate them. Lastly, I didn't know we can put possesive adjectives like my,your, his... in front of gerunds before you said wanting is a gerund. Can we put possesive adjectives in front of all gerunds? For example, His studying English is more effective than mine.

Hi Nevı,

Yes, that's right :)

But for your example, I would say one of these versions instead:

  • His studying is more effective than mine.
  • His studying of English is more effective than mine.

The reason is that a gerund (e.g. studying) is somewhere between a verb and a noun (see this comment thread for a more detailed explanation). If you add a possessive adjective, it makes it more noun-like than verb-like, and nouns have a preposition before an object - that's why I added 'of' in the second sentence. 

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Mussorie on Wed, 23/06/2021 - 12:17

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Could you please explain the below structures and their differences in more detail because they are more confusing? can they be used interchangeably? 1.English learners sometimes have trouble choosing between the endings. choosing ( present participle followed by a noun "trouble") 2.English learners sometimes have trouble in choosing between the endings. noun (trouble) + preposition + gerund (choosing) 3.English learners sometimes have trouble to choose between the endings. noun (trouble) + infinitive (to choose).

Hello Mussorie,

I think the first two forms can be used interchangeably. The third one does not look correct to me as a UK English speaker.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Could you please explain the difference in meaning between the first two sentences, if possible, then the third sentence?

Hello Mussorie,

The first two sentences can be used interchangeably, which means there is no difference in meaning between them. The third sentence is not a correct form, so there is no meaning to explain.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Sun, 13/06/2021 - 15:45

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Hello fantastic team! I am writing to find out more about participle clauses with conjunctions. I saw following sentence in the reading text. "She became very tearful when pressed to talk about it." Here I can see -when+past participle phrase-. But I haven't known we can use past participle phrases with conjunctions, until I saw the sentence above. I just knew sentences like 'I saw her while walking on the street' (Subjects must be the same.) Would it be possible for you to explain how I can use past participle phrases with conjunctions? Thank you in advance.

Hi Nevı,

It isn't possible with all conjunctions, but it is commonly used after when. The past participle clause describes the subject of the main clause (i.e., She became very tearful when (she was) pressed to talk about it). The past participle clause normally has a passive meaning, and when shows that the two actions happened at or around the same time.

Here are some more examples.

  • When asked who his hero was, he replied 'my teacher'.
  • The disease can be cured easily when detected early.

I hope that helps.

Jonathan

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Thu, 03/06/2021 - 19:28

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Hi superb team! I wondered sth about using participles for giving results. Can I use participle phrases for any sentence containing cause-effect relationship? For example,I am not sure if I can write following sentence "He was late to class for the third time this week , suspended from his school." -He was late to class for the third time, so he was suspended from his school." If it is not,what kind of sentence can I use participle phrases for giving results? I'd really appreciate your help.

Hi Nevi,

A present participle (-ing) can describe the result of an action, but it's important to remember that the participle's action always refers back to the subject of the main clause. For example:

The bomb exploded, destroying the building.

It is the bomb which is doing the destroying here.

 

Your sentences contain past participles (-ed), which have a passive meaning. You could describe a result using a present participle:

He was late to class for the third time this week, causing him to be suspended / resulting in his suspension from his school

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Sun, 06/06/2021 - 17:26

In reply to by Peter M.

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Hmmm Teacher, I am confused about one thing in your example sentence. "He was late to class for the third time this week, causing him to be suspended" You said - the participle's action always refers back to the subject of the main clause.- Here, subject of the main clause is he while subject of the participle phrase is again he? He caused himself to be suspended? I would be grateful if you could help me to understand that sentence correctly. You'd be doing me a huge favour.
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Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 07/06/2021 - 07:40

In reply to by Nevı

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Hello Nevi.

To be precise, the participle here refers to the action performed by the man: being late for class caused him to be suspended.

In participle clauses, the participle does not introduce a new actor. Whatever it describes refers to the same actor as that in the main clause.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Got that teacher. Is the sentence like "He was late to class for the third time this week, which causes him to be suspended. "? Here which refers to whole first clause 'He was late to class for the third time this week. Am I right teacher?

Hello Nevi,

Yes, in this example, 'which' refers to the whole first clause.

Please note that the wording of the relative clause is a little awkward. I'd recommend 'which is the reason he's been suspended' or something like that.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Arafat on Wed, 02/06/2021 - 08:40

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Hello there. I'll truly be thankful to clear my doubts. 1. The bomb exploded, killed two people. 2. The bomb exploded, killing two people. 1. The participants breaking the rules will be removed from the competition. 2. The participants broken the rules will be removed from the competition. Are all these sentences grammatically correct? If yes, what is the difference between 1 and 2 in each pair of the sentences?

Hello Arafat,

In each pair, the correct form is with -ing (present participle).

The present participle has an active meaning, while the past participle (-ed) has a passive meaning. In your examples an active meaning is required: it is the bomb which explodes and the participants who break the rules.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Fri, 07/05/2021 - 20:03

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Hi outstanding team! I am trying to learn participle clauses's function like time relationships, reason results, condition. I was confused about one thing. I saw following sentence 'She left the room singing happily.' I don't know if I can also say 'Singing happily, she left the room. ' I saw some participle clauses for actions happening at the same time at the beginning of a sentence and also at the end of the sentence. Is there a rule like if clause at the beginning, put comma after clause and if clause an the end, don't put comma. I'd really appreciate it.

Hi Nevi,

That sentence is fine.

When the participle clause comes at the start we separate it with a comma, as you say. When the participle clause comes after the main clause the comma is optional and is generally a stylistic choice. Using a comma suggests a spoken pause, which can add emphasis to the action in the participle clause.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Fri, 30/04/2021 - 16:57

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Hi excellent team, I want to know something. I saw that grammatical explanation while working reduced adjective clauses. 'This morning I saw a man who walked along the river.'='This morning I saw a man walking along the river.' I am confused, because I thought we can just use it for defining relative clauses. I mean can we say for example 'I saw Harry Kane playing football.' Is it like' I saw Harry Kane who is playing football.'? But we don't need to define him. I don't know whether I could explain my confusion. I would be grateful if you could answer me. Best wishes!

Hello Nevi,

These are examples of participle clauses, which are not the same as relative/adjective clauses. Compare:

1. I saw Harry Kane, who was playing football. 

2. I saw Harry Kane playing football.

The first sentence is a non-defining relative clause. As you say, it cannot be reduced. The relative clause provides additional information about the noun.

The second sentence is a participle clause. It does not provide additional information about Harry Kane but rather describes an action in progress at the time of the first action.

 

I think you'll see the difference if you look at this example, where only one form is possible:

While I was in London I saw Harry Kane, who was living in Italy at the time.

You cannot use a participle clause here because the actions are not simultaneous: living in Italy is a general state, not an action at the same as time as my seeing him.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks teacher, Plus, that sentence 'Lawyers showed the video of former officer pressing his knee on black man. ' I think the part 'officer pressing his knee on black man. ' is not reduced relative clause. Is it also participle clause? I would be grateful if you could explain the rule to me.

Hello again Nevi,

Yes, that is a participle clause. A relative clause here would be a defining relative clause identifying which officer is being described (the officer who... and not another officer). Here, however, the participle is describing the action being performed in the video.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Teacher I realised sth about some group of verbs like 'to see,to show, to film, to photograph, to notice to video, to watch' These verbs are like in the same group sth. Because I always see examples with participle clause I mean object+ doing something. What's the rule about that kinf 8f verbs teacher? I would be grateful if you could explain it to me. Best wishes

Hello again Nevi,

You're right that we do often use verbs related to perception or visualisation with participle clauses. This is because their meaning lends itself to describing actions in progress. When we see something it is generally doing something. The acts of seeing/showing/watching etc are by their nature interruptions: they happen during another action or state.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Ahmed Imam on Fri, 30/04/2021 - 15:28

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Hello. What is the difference between: 1- I really loved the flowers grown in London. 2- I really loved the flowers growing in London. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

The second sentence is grammatically correct but unlikely. It describes flowers which are growing now. The speaker might be looking out of their window at a panorama of the city and describing how beautiful the flowers are. However, London is such a large place that it seems unlikely it would be used as a location in this way, unless 'London' is a shortened reference for a certain place within the city rather than the whole city itself.

The first sentence is ambiguous. It could refer to some flowers which were grown in London and have been cut, or it could describe the flowers of London more generally: the flowers which are grown in London.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello again. I think the following sentences are correct and meaningful, right? 1- I love the flowers which are grown in London. 2- I love the flowers which grow in London. Thank you.

Hello Ahmed Imam,

Yes, those are perfectly fine sentences. As ever, whethere or not they are appropriate will depend on the context and the speaker's intention.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nevı on Mon, 26/04/2021 - 14:02

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Hi incredible team, I want to ask something about participle adjectives. For example, when I want to write that sentence 'The choked man in the restaurant was immediately sent to the hospital.' (to choke - - >past participle form chocked as an adjective) I looked the dictionary it says different thing https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/choked?q=Choked I would be grateful if you could explain me why it says like that. or I made a mistake. Thank you in advance. Many thanks.

Hello Nevi,

In brief, it's because that's how we use the word 'choked'. Although many adjectives are formed from the past participle of a verb, they don't always have the same meaning as the verb and so can't be used in the way you've tried to use 'choked' in your sentence.

As far as I know, there are no patterns to this -- that is, I'm afraid there's no general rule that explains if or how you can use a past participle as an adjective. That's what the dictionary is for.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

If I want to rewrite the sentence , Like "The man choked in the restaurant was immediately sent to the hospital.'' Is it now possible my changed sentence, teacher ? Thank you in advance.

Hello Nevi,

'choke' can be transitive or intransitive. The way the sentence is written, I understand 'choke' to be transitive (which means someone else tried to kill the man) and the beginning as a reduced version of 'The man who was choked ...'

But I doubt that's what you meant. If you want 'choke' to be intransitive -- in other words, the man chokes on food -- then I'd recommend saying 'The man who choked on some food in the restaurant ...' instead.

As far as I know, there's no rule that explains this difference. It's a matter of usage.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Oh ı understand now, teacher. I really appreciate it.
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Submitted by Rafaela1 on Mon, 26/04/2021 - 12:31

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Having finished responding to emails, he started hitting the hay. ;)

Submitted by Tony1980 on Thu, 22/04/2021 - 14:03

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Hi Kirk I’m reposting my last comment in here. The fashion houses chosen by the magazine provide the clothes they want featured but it’s the stylist’s job to make sure they’re shown in the best possible light. That means finding accessories to set them off , making decisions about the models’ hair. Finding and making are present participle or gerund here? And why please? Best wishes Andi
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Submitted by Kirk on Mon, 26/04/2021 - 11:11

In reply to by Tony1980

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Hello Andi,

I'd say they are gerunds here. Those two activities are aspects of the job of showing the clothes in the best possible light.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Kirk Thanks a lot for the response. One last question about this. Are these gerunds here that you mentioned object of the sentence? Best wishes Andi
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Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 29/04/2021 - 07:55

In reply to by Tony1980

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Hi Andi,

Yes, they are objects of the verb 'means'.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Maahir on Thu, 08/04/2021 - 13:51

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Being non native English student, found difficult to understand this lesson. Hi teacher, thanks for the lesson, but I am a little bit confused about the lesson, so it would be great if you share with me a link where I can find more explained lessons about Participle clause. Thanks in advance.

Hello Maahir,

I'm sorry to hear that you found the explanation inaccessible. You could try this Free Dictionary page, but I also wanted to say that I'd probably recommend you study other grammar before devoting too much time to this. This is because unless you need to write or speak in formal contexts, participle clauses are probably something you don't need to be able to produce yourself.

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

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Submitted by Rafaela1 on Thu, 08/04/2021 - 13:30

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Looking back my work, I should have done better... ;)

Submitted by Nevı on Tue, 06/04/2021 - 17:29

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Hi great site administers and teachers, I read "Participle clauses do not have a specific tense. The tense is indicated by the verb in the main clause." in that page. And I was confused when I saw the sentence in the text. 'Small publishers using Google’s advertising sales technology have said for years that their...' Present participle clause in the sentence is 'Small publishers using Google’s advertising sales' However, It is reduced from 'Small publishers who are using...' or 'who has been using' or maybe 'who were using'.? Which one? And how can we know the participle clause is reduced from which tense? Thank you Best wishes.

Hello Nevi,

Relative clauses have an adjectival function: they provide further information about a noun, and they directly follow the noun phrase which they describe. This is the function we can see in your example, where 'using Google's advertising sales technology' describes the noun phrase 'Small publishers' and cannot be moved to another position in the sentence.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thanks teacher, I mean Small publishers using Google’s advertising sales technology = Small publishers who are using? or have been using? or were using? How do we know which tense participle clause is. Best wishes.

Hello again Nevi,

Unless the context indicates otherwise, we assume that the time reference is consistent with the rest of the sentence. That would mean a present meaning.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team