Nouns

Nouns are words that give a name to people, places or things, though they can also refer to ideas and other abstract objects. 

Nouns are words that give a name to people, places or things, though they can also refer to ideas and other abstract objects. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how nouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Submitted by Nagie23 on Wed, 02/11/2022 - 12:22

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Hello,
If I am a history teacher and I want to inform the parent about his children progress is is correct to say
Hello,I would Iike to inform you about his progress in the lesson ?
Thank you in advance

Hello Nagie23,

As the comment is written, it seems to suggest progress in the course of a single lesson rather than over a longer period of time. I would suggest one of the following:

Hello. I would Iike to inform you/let you know/pass on a few comments about his progress to date/thus far/to this point in the semester/school year/course.

 

Please note that comments are pre-moderated on the site to weed out spam and the like, so when you post a comment there is always a delay before it appears on the page. There's no need to post multiple times - your comment will appear in due course.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nagie23 on Mon, 20/12/2021 - 23:28

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Hello,
Which one of the following is correct when writing a letter
1.This year I would like a present for people/children who are in need
2. The present that I would like for them are... Food, clothes etc
Thank you in advance

Hello Nagie23,

Both sentences are fine, apart from needing to say 'presents' (plural) in the second sentence.

Peter
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nagie23 on Sun, 19/12/2021 - 09:00

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Hello,
I wouldlike to ask the following :
If I have a flat for rent(I am the landlord), when I cancel or not do/make the procedure of renting, which of the following is correct
1.I couldn't make the reservation OR
2.I couldnt make a / the booking
Thank you in advance

Hello Nagie23,

Could you explain the situation a bit more? I have understood that you own a flat that you rent to other people, but do you rent it long-term (to people who live in it for at least a few months) or do you rent it short-term (for tourists who are there for days or a week or two)?

Also, who are you explaining this to and for what purpose? For example, are you explaining it to the town council? Or is it something you're putting on a website where people look for flats?

I'm sorry to ask all of this, but I need to understand the situation better to make a good recommendation.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
1.If I am the landlord and I rent the flat short term(1 to 3 months)and put it on a website or explain to a person who is interested in renting a flat the following :
Can I say: I had to cancel the booking or the reservation?
2. If I am the landlord and I rent the flat long term (1 year or more)
Can I say: I am sorry, I had to cancel the agreement /booking/or reservation?
3. Short term can be up to 3 months?
Thank you in advance

Hello Nagie23,

1) If you say 'I had to cancel the booking' (or 'reservation'), this suggests that there was already an agreement between you and a client for a specific stay. The flat being advertised on a website is not a booking.

If you had to remove your flat from the website -- for example, maybe you decided to live in the flat yourself -- then you could say 'I had to remove the flat from the website'.

2) The terms 'booking' or 'reservation' generally refer to shorter-term rentals. Often people speak about a 'lease', which is a formal written agreement between a landlord and tenant for living arrangements (as opposed to travel).

3) Whether we call something 'short' or 'long' term really depends on the context or situation. I'm not involved in either tourism or renting flats, but from my perspective, a three-month lease would be very short, but a three-month booking for a tourist flat would be very long.

Hope this helps!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team