Future continuous and future perfect

Future continuous and future perfect

Do you know how to use phrases like I'll be studying or I'll have finished? Test what you know with interactive exercises and read the explanation to help you.

Look at these examples to see how the future continuous and future perfect are used.

In three years' time, I'll be studying medicine.
In five years' time, I'll have finished studying medicine.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar test 1

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Future continuous

We can use the future continuous (will/won't be + -ing form) to talk about future actions that: 

  • will be in progress at a specific time in the future:

When you come out of school tomorrow, I'll be boarding a plane.
Try to call before 8 o'clock. After that, we'll be watching the match.
You can visit us during the first week of July. I won't be working then.

  • we see as new, different or temporary:

Today we're taking the bus but next week we'll be taking the train.
He'll be staying with his parents for several months while his father is in recovery.
Will you be starting work earlier with your new job?

Future perfect

We use the future perfect simple (will/won't have + past participle) to talk about something that will be completed before a specific time in the future.

The guests are coming at 8 p.m. I'll have finished cooking by then.
On 9 October we'll have been married for 50 years.
Will you have gone to bed when I get back?

We can use phrases like by or by the time (meaning 'at some point before') and in or in a day's time / in two months' time / in five years' time etc. (meaning 'at the end of this period') to give the time period in which the action will be completed.

I won't have written all the reports by next week.
By the time we arrive, the kids will have gone to bed.
I'll have finished in an hour and then we can watch a film.
In three years' time, I'll have graduated from university.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar test 2

Future continuous and future perfect: Grammar test 2

Average: 4.1 (101 votes)

Submitted by ketty27am on Sat, 10/02/2024 - 18:21

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Hi, I have a question related to the Future Tenses. Should we use Future Perfect in a sentence with "before the end of the year"? For example, "The school will have been finished before the end of the year". Or we should use Future Simple "The school will be finished before the end of the year"

Hello ketty27am,

There is no need to use a perfect form here, and also no need to use passive voice. The modal 'will' (not a tense, by the way) followed by a bare infinitive is sufficient:

The school will finish before the end of the year.

You can use a perfect form (the modal 'will' followed by a perfect infinitive) if you wish to emphasise the time. For example, if you are telling someone that there is a deadline which they need to keep:

A: I'll complete the project in the New Year.

B: That's too late! The school will have finished before the end of the year.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by .Mariia on Fri, 09/02/2024 - 09:19

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Hello,
could you pleaese help me with these sentences.
The whole family arrived a few days ago and _____with us until next Monday. ( STAY)
Can we use future perfect here or future continuous is better
a)The whole family arrived a few days ago and will be staying with us until next Monday.
b) The whole family arrived a few days ago and will have stayed with us until next Monday.

Hi .Mariia,

Only a) is possible in this example, because it says "until next Monday". "Until" means the action continued into next Monday, and ended on that day. The future perfect, however, means that the action ended before the mentioned time, so it can't go together with "until".

The simple future "will stay" also works in this example.

I hope that helps to understand the answers here!

Jonathan

LearnEnglish team

Submitted by Greenityvert on Mon, 05/02/2024 - 19:06

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Hi! Can you help me, please? I need to know whether both of the following variants are possible: By the time I graduate from the university, I will have decided ....... By the time I have graduated from the university, I will have decided....
I understand the reason of using Future Perfect Simple - the question is whether present simple is the only option in the first part of the sentence. Thanks in advance!!!

Hi Greenityvert,

Yes, both "I graduate" and "I have graduated" are possible. The future perfect "I have graduated" emphasises the completion (or the 'already-done-ness') of the graduation slightly more.

Jonathan

LearnEnglish team

Submitted by Khangvo2812 on Wed, 24/01/2024 - 06:20

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If I understand correctly, both of the present continuous and future continuous can be used to talk about temporary situations?

Hello Khangvo2812,

Yes, that's correct.

I'm living in London at the moment. [a temporary situation]

I'll be living in London for two months next year. [a temporary situation]

Of course, other uses are possible for these forms as well, but these are very common uses.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Khangvo2812 on Wed, 24/01/2024 - 06:15

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I was wondering whether there is a difference between using the present continuous and future continuous in the sentence below.
I will be working/ am working from September.