How we make adverbials

An adverbial can be an adverb:

He spoke angrily.
They live here.
We will be back soon.

or an adverb with an intensifier:

He spoke really angrily.
They live just here.
We will go quite soon.

or a prepositional phrase:

He spoke in an angry voice.
They live in London.
We will go in a few minutes.

or a noun phrase:

It rained this morning.
They went to Cambodia last summer.

or a clause:

They went to the mountains because they like to ski.
She played tennis when she was young.

Adverbials 1

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Adverbials 2

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Adverbials 3

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Submitted by Kunthea on Fri, 07/05/2021 - 11:34

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Hello teachers! For the second point of 'How we make adverbials', an adverb with a quantifier. I need your help with these examples: He spoke really angrily. They live just here. We will go quite soon. Are the words 'really, just, quite' quantifiers? If I'm not mistaken since I've learned in this website so far, they are called 'intensifiers and mitigators'. Which means they are used to make adjectives stronger or less strong. How can they be quantifiers? One more thing, if they are intensifiers or mitigators, do they mean to make adverbs stronger or less strong like adjectives too? Thank you with the help!

Hello Kunthea,

Yes, I'd say you're right about this. We are going to consider how to best revise this page and then will fix it sometime soon.

I'm very sorry for any confusion this may have caused and thank you very much for pointing this out to us!

All the best,

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

I'm happy to do it. I've learned a lot from this helpful website. Thank you!

Submitted by OlaIELTS on Fri, 26/06/2020 - 23:51

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It's really improves my knowledge.

Submitted by Yerlan on Fri, 31/01/2020 - 09:02

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If "clear" is adverb, then why isn't it "clearly"?

Submitted by Yerlan on Fri, 31/01/2020 - 08:59

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Hello Dear tacher, Please tell me whether the word "clear" is adjective or adverb in this sentence below " Read clear grammar explanations" it comes after verb and before noun. Thaks a lot.

Hello Yerlan

'clear' is an adjective here -- it tells us more about the grammar explanations. If it was an adverb, it would be 'clearly'.

I'd suggest you check words like these in the dictionary (follow the links in the previous paragraph).

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Nada Ibrahim on Fri, 25/10/2019 - 02:49

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Dear Sir, Is "together" an adverb of manner?

Submitted by Peter M. on Fri, 25/10/2019 - 06:56

In reply to by Nada Ibrahim

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Hello Nada Ibrahim,

'Together' can be an adverb or an adjective.

When used as an adverb, you could say that it describes the manner in which an action is done. However, 'adverb of manner' is really a descriptive term which teachers use rather than a real linguistic term. It describes the function of the adverb in a particular example rather than being a category in which the word belongs.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Darshanie Ratnawalli on Wed, 15/08/2018 - 17:16

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Please tell me if the adverb 'already' is a sentence adverb (an adverb modifying a whole sentence/clause) in the following examples 1) She was running quite fast already when she started speed training 2) She was already very thin when she had liposuction 3)My mother was already pregnant when she married my father

Hello Darshanie Ratnawalli,

'already' is not a sentence adverb here, nor is it commonly used as one. Sentence adverbs typically go at the beginning of the sentence -- you can read more about them here.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by philharis on Fri, 08/06/2018 - 02:23

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Hello sirs, is this sentence correct'' the woman who sell fish also sell yam''. regards.

Hello philharis,

Not quite. You need to use the third-person form after 'the woman':

The woman who sells fish also sells yams.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ali boroki on Tue, 19/12/2017 - 08:28

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Hi dear teacher. I have question about from of question on the task,"they behaved very badly"the answer was N-V-I- Am i right??but im confused "they"is the subject.and why here we called as noun?? Best regard Ali.

Hello Ali boroki,

'they' is the subject of the sentence, and it is also a pronoun, which is a kind of a noun. When we speak about 'nouns', 'adjectives', 'verbs', 'adverbs, 'prepositions', we're talking about parts of speech -- in other words, the kinds of words that exist in sentences.

When we talk about a 'subject' and a 'verb', we're also talking about the parts of a sentence, but looking more at how they work together to make meaning. In this case, 'they' is a pronoun, and this pronoun (which is a kind of noun) is also the subject of the verb.

Think of a vegetable, for example, a carrot. From one perspective, a carrot is something you plant in a garden. From another perspective, it is a kind of food. It's similar with us calling 'they' a noun in one place and a subject in another.

Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by johnnyhey on Mon, 11/12/2017 - 02:41

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Hi sirs, Could you please tell me the difference between 'kindly regards' or 'kind regards' that used at the end of one e-mail? Thanks and best regards!

Submitted by Peter M. on Mon, 11/12/2017 - 07:38

In reply to by johnnyhey

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Hi johnnyhey,

'Kind regards' is a popular way end emails and letters to people you know. We do not use 'kindly regards'; it is not a correct form.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by dawnpcT on Wed, 15/02/2017 - 01:38

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I was reading something about subjunctive mood, but am not so sure about the limits to its usage. Eg., "If I were an angel, I would ...." looks to be the norm. But "The guide recommended that we see the lions first" poses a bit of a question as the verb "see" is in the present tense. Please help.

Hello TPC,

Both of the examples you provide are fine and both are examples of the subjunctive. The key is the verb which precedes it. Here, that verb is recommend and that takes a subjunctive form. For example:

recommend (that) + subject + subjunctive

I recommend that he be informed as soon as possible

We use 'be' rather than the present form 'is' because it follows the verb recommend.

You can read more about subjunctive forms in English here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by dawnpcT on Thu, 22/09/2016 - 06:32

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Hi, Sometimes I hear people say " I m not so much concerned about this than that." Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 22/09/2016 - 13:04

In reply to by dawnpcT

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Hello TPC,

'so much concerned' sounds unnatural to my ears. Normally, 'so' (not 'so much') goes with an adjective. I'd also probably say 'as that' instead of 'than that'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team 

Submitted by Githuga on Sun, 26/07/2015 - 23:22

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It s wrong also to use the subtitle "where they go in a sentence" as the clause does not auger well with the title "Adverbials"and the rest of the sub tittles. I think t ought be "Adverbial in a sentence" as a sub title on the English Grammar left column . More so in my humble opinion "Adverbs in a sentence" During my schooling years I knew of Adverbs, this adverbials term is new. Tell me its a newer version of adverbs

Hello Githuga,

'Adverbials' is a broader term than 'adverbs'. 'Adverbs' are individual words; 'adverbials' are words and phrases which function as adverbs in the sentence. It is a similar distinction to that between 'nouns' and 'noun phrases'.

The subtitle you query is correct.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Githuga on Sun, 26/07/2015 - 22:05

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Adverbial clauses: structure Select the correct structure of each clause. 2. He went upstairs. The above question 2 exercise on "Adverbial clauses: structure" is not in agreement with the intended clause structure. It is assumed that the grammatical "subjects", in this case Noun, Preposition, Adverb, Intensifier is presented as initial capital letter. Noe it follows that question two has got the following choices "a. N-V-A" "b. N-V-P" "c. N-V-I-A" It therefore follows that there is no right answer as the first word is a Pronoun.This sentence ought to have the clause structure as" P-V-A" where "P" stands for pronoun. What happens when now a sentence has got a preposition and a pronoun or an adjective and an adverb? let me procced with the exercise may be I'll find out.

Hello Githuga,

The 'N' here refers to noun phrase, and a pronoun can form a noun phrase.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by grammar2015 on Wed, 10/06/2015 - 02:51

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Hi teachers Please the sample above does not include 'to infinitive' as one of the method of making adverbial. May I know if to+ infinitive is not playing the role of Adverb? To get the money is very difficult. The to infinitive = the subject. The man to pay the fees has just arrived. The to infinitive is an adjective modifying 'the man' They traveled to visit their son . is the to infinitive an adverbial modifying traveled ?

Submitted by MayelaM on Sun, 07/06/2015 - 02:23

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Most of adjectives that are used as adverbs end on "ly". Is there an adverb rule to double the "l" when forming an adverb? For example: Carefully (has double the character "l") in contrast with angry that you just write angrily (one "l") or happy where you change the y for "i" and use one "l". Thanks

Hello MayelaM,

Yes, that is the general pattern for adverb formation. Well done for working it out!

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

May you please re formulate your answer? I am asking how to form them and whether there is a rule that a person can follow. The original posting only mention 2 examples but I see not all the adverbs follow it. It might be obvious for many students when speaking or writing, but not all the time for me. Thanks

Hello MayelaM,

The rules you mentioned are correct:

y > i [pretty > prettily], easy > easily

final 'l' is generally doubled [hopeful > hopefully]

These are the two main rules to follow. There are also irregular forms, such as those in which the adverb is not similar to the adjective [good > well] or is identical [hard > hard, fast > fast].

You can read more about adverb formation here.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by grammar2015 on Fri, 29/05/2015 - 04:23

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Question3: They stopped at the end of the street. The answer is N-V-P . the sentence has two prepositional phrases 1, at the end, 2. of the street. the first one is an adverb of time modifying the verb, stopped. The second one is also an adverb of place modifying the first adverb. Therefore, the second adverb modifies the first adverb. [N-V-P-P] am I correct?

Hello grammar,

'at the end' has to do with location, not with time, i.e. 'the end of the street' is a place. It's true that 'the end' can refer to time in a sense (e.g. 'the end of the film'), but we usually think of it as a part of something larger.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by pisco on Thu, 21/05/2015 - 12:58

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I find these tutorials very helpful

Submitted by Saleh Alhamwi on Sun, 19/10/2014 - 13:17

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There is wrong 'Very' is not Q=quantifier 'Very' is Intensifiers See: http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/adjectives/intensifiers the quantifiers as : the, this my See: http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/determiners-and-quantifiers

Hello Saleh Alhamwi,

I've now fixed this error - great work spotting that! Thanks very much for helping us improve the site for everyone.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by ramadhoini (not verified) on Wed, 09/10/2013 - 15:55

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thanks a bandle

Submitted by mansooransari777 on Sat, 05/10/2013 - 16:11

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i am bit confused about the placement of adverbs in sentence.
Hello mansooransari777, Have you looked at the next page? That should answer your question: http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/where-they-go-sentence Best wishes, Peter The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by mansooransari777 on Sat, 05/10/2013 - 16:10

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its difficult for me to understand adverbial without teacher

Submitted by osvaldo costa luemba on Tue, 07/05/2013 - 18:03

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Hello B.C. I wish i could know how can i do to improve my pronunciation, because when i spoke some words seems like Potuguese. I'd like to know if anyone can aid me. Sorry about my mistakes. Thanks

Hello osvaldo!

 

Welcome to LearnEnglish!

We don't have a lot on pronunciation, although you can try our pronunication guide. Make sure you do plenty of listenings - we have stories and poems on the site. You could also record yourself reading aloud or answering some of our discussion questions using a site like www.vocaroo.com. Then, listen to the recording and see what you can improve.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Regards

 

Jeremy Bee

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by yomnamango on Wed, 06/02/2013 - 14:04

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May i know gently why doesn't Exercise work :( ?

Hello,

We had some problems with the exercises today. They should be fixed now.

Best wishes,

Adam

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by zakirxan on Thu, 03/01/2013 - 06:59

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this exercise is useful for english learners. I think so

Submitted by Adoh Rebs on Fri, 09/11/2012 - 11:05

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Hello Viodel

i understand quantifiers to be words used to describe or measure how strong or less an adjective is. it is not only about numbers. for example, we can say

He was angry. angry in this case is not quantified. but if we say he was REALLY angry, we measured how angry he was. because we can not say he was 90% angry we substitute that number with words like really, just e.t.c

hope it helps

The learning team, please correct me if i am wrong.

Hello Adoh & Viodel!

 

That's a pretty good description, Adoh - well done! However, we usually call these words intensifers, and we have a page for practicing them. Quantifiers are words and phrases used with nouns, like much or a couple. Some phrases (like a little) can be both quantifiers (a little water) or intensifiers (a little sad). The page is a little confusing, so I have changed it!

 

Hope that helps!



Regards

 

Jeremy Bee

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by c0chi on Thu, 20/09/2012 - 03:16

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Is there any way to track the exircises done?

Accumulating points or something like that.

Why this exercise say that I can get 2 points doing it? How can I get it?

 

thanks! bye