'still' and 'no longer', 'already' and 'yet'

Level: beginner

still

We use still to show that something continues up to a time in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

Even when my father was 65, he still enjoyed playing tennis.
It's past midnight but she's still doing her homework.
I won't be at work next week. We'll still be on holiday.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Her grandfather has been very ill, but he is still alive.
We tried to help them, but they were still unhappy.

no longer

We use no longer to show the idea of something stopping in the past, present or future. It goes in front of the main verb:

At that moment, I realised that I no longer loved him.
We no longer live in England. We've moved to France.
From midnight tonight, Mr Jones will no longer be the president.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

Sadly, Andrew and Bradley are no longer friends. They had an argument.
It was no longer safe to stay in the country. We had to leave immediately.

In a negative sentence, we use any longer or any more. It goes at the end of the sentence:

We don't live in England any longer.
It wasn't safe to stay in the country any more.

still and no longer 1

GapFillTyping_MTU3NzQ=

still and no longer 2

GapFillTyping_MTU3NzU=

already

We use already to show that something has happened sooner than it was expected to happen. It goes in front of the main verb:

The car is OK. I've already fixed it.
It was early but they were already sleeping.

or after the present simple or past simple of be:

It was early but we were already tired.
We are already late.

Sometimes already comes at the end of the sentence for emphasis:

It's very early but they are sleeping already.
It was early but we were tired already.
When we got there, most people had arrived already.

yet

We use yet in a negative or interrogative clause, usually with perfective aspect (especially in British English), to show that something has not happened by a particular time. yet comes at the end of a sentence:

It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet.
Have you fixed the car yet?
She won't have sent the email yet.

already and yet

GapFillDragAndDrop_MTU3NzY=

Take your language skills and your career to the next level
Get unlimited access to our self-study courses for only £5.99/month.

Hello david671023,

That sentence would need a few small changes to be completely correct:

Whatsapp has been blocked yet again in Brazil after a legal dispute

However, in newspaper headlines certain words are often omitted, such as articles and auxiliary verbs. Therefore, in the context of a newspaper headline the sentence would be fine; if you were using it elsewhere then it would be changed as above.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by chopsticks on Wed, 29/06/2016 - 11:08

Permalink
Can u pls tell me what is correct between these two: 1.) I am not yet part of the group. 2.) I am not part of the group yet. Thank u

Hello chopsticks,

There is no difference in meaning between these two sentences. 'yet' in middle position (as in 1) is not used as often in informal situations, but that's the only difference I can think of to mention.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by HomaT on Wed, 04/05/2016 - 08:47

Permalink
what does it means exactly "I am beginning already to suspect..."? means I suspect before? from now to future? or what? thank you.

Hello HomaT,

It means that right now you are beginning to suspect or that your suspicions began just a short time ago.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by fabricio.araujo on Wed, 20/04/2016 - 16:02

Permalink
Hello, What about those afirmative sentences with YET? Is there any rule/comments? Kind regards, Fabrício

Submitted by Kirk on Wed, 20/04/2016 - 17:34

In reply to by fabricio.araujo

Permalink

Hello Fabrício,

'yet' isn't typically used in affirmative sentences in an informal style, but you can find it in a more formal style. This is explained in a bit more detail on this archived BBC page, which I think you might find useful.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Ahmedkhairy on Sat, 09/04/2016 - 12:36

Permalink
Hai, "a student lost in a world of stupid systems, yet finds solace in his books" is this grammatically right?! Thank u :)

Hello Ahmedkhairy,

The phrase you ask about makes sense and is quite expressive, though by itself it's not a complete sentence. What is the larger context (i.e. what comes before and after it)?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Dr dreamer on Wed, 16/03/2016 - 08:35

Permalink
What is correct for a book that i half read ? Yet to be completed OR Yet to complete

Submitted by Paul Cho on Fri, 19/02/2016 - 17:57

Permalink
Hello, sir. I have come to find your homepage while I was studying the usage 'already and yet'. according to your site, there is an explanation about this grammar usage. Have you finished the work already? Have you finished the work yet? Someone who is a English native speaker has said to me that there is no difference between the two sentences above in real English. But I don't know why but I have had to keep questioning about this matter. I think there must be some difference between the two above. Now here are my questions. 1) Is it true that there is no difference between the sentences above in real English? 2) If there is a crystal-clearly difference between the two in real English, what is the difference? Thank you in advance.

Hello Paul Cho,

In your example sentences, 'already' suggests that it is earlier than expected; it means something like 'so quickly'.

'Yet' can be neutral or can be slightly critical, suggesting that it is taking longer than it should.

We generally use 'yet' in negative sentences and questions rather than in affirmative sentences.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

thank you for your reply. But I want to get it straight. According to your comment, in English-speaking countries, these two sentences are clearly different, right? Thank you in advance.

Hello Paul Cho,

As I said in the previous reply, the difference between the sentences is the connotation. Both sentences ask about the same situation, but while one ('already') is used for something quicker than expected, the other ('yet') is used with a more neutral meaning.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by korejar on Sat, 05/12/2015 - 12:32

Permalink
could we use (yet) in one sentence which is negative and question at the same time. like : Haven't you finished yet? is it correct ?

Submitted by Lamastry on Tue, 15/09/2015 - 21:43

Permalink
hello your teachings are quite helpful. thank you a lot. i am quite confused with the phrases "it's time" and "it's high time" someone told me that the first one is for past tenses and i'm trying to understand but i cannot perfectly understand how they can be used. May please you please explain

Hello Lamastry,

Please know that we are a very small team with a lot of work. We answer comments as quickly as we can, but we cannot make any guaranteers as to when we will answer. In any case, there's no need to remind us of questions we haven't answered yet – we will get to them as soon as we can.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Lamastry,

If you look up 'it's time' in the Cambridge Dictionaries Online search box on the lower right side of this screen, you'll see entries for both 'time' and 'high time'. If you want to understand them more, you could also do an internet search. If you have a very specific question about a specific sentence, then you're welcome to ask it here, but I'm afraid that explaining general grammar points is not a service we provide.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by grammar2015 on Fri, 12/06/2015 - 04:02

Permalink
Hi It is stated above that 'already' comes before the main verb. But question 5 above, the answer shows that it is at the end of the clause. Have you finished the book already? can it be like the following sentence? Have you already finished the book? Please tell me why it is at the end of the clause.

Submitted by Peter M. on Sat, 13/06/2015 - 19:20

In reply to by grammar2015

Permalink

Hello grammar2015,

The position of the adverb is quite flexible. It can come at the end, as in the example you quote, or before the main verb. It cannot come after the main verb, however:

Have you finished the book already? [at the end = OK]

Have you already finished the book? [before the main verb = OK]

Have you finished already the book? [after the main verb = not OK]

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Israel Bango on Wed, 27/05/2015 - 12:54

Permalink
I liked this explanation, so that I can know use them correctly!

Submitted by Shikkharthi on Tue, 31/03/2015 - 08:47

Permalink
Hi, What does the sentence mean "Malaysian plane yet to be found"? Does it mean the plane haven't found? If so, then why did they not use any negative words with yet? I've also read a newspaper title like "The result yet to be published''. Thanks in advance.

 

Hi Shikkharthi,

In any language there are alternative ways of saying things. As you suggest, 'yet to be + past participle' means the same as 'has not yet been + past participle':

The plane has yet to be found.

The plane has not yet been found.

The difference is really a question of style: 'yet to be' is a more formal way to phrase this. It is quite common in official language, such as from governments, authorities and also newspapers.

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by mariojose on Thu, 19/03/2015 - 14:53

Permalink
Hi, I would like to know why did you used "hadn't" and not "haven't" in site example: "It was late, but they hadn’t arrived yet" In my study material they used: "They haven't arrived yet" Thank you and best regards, Mario

Submitted by Kirk on Fri, 20/03/2015 - 08:18

In reply to by mariojose

Permalink

Hello Mario,

The time in these two sentences is different. In 'They haven't arrived yet', someone is speaking about now. E.g. you and I are waiting for Tess and Ravi, and they are late. We could say this sentence to comment on this.

'It was late, but they hadn't arrived yet' is referring to a time in the past ('it was late'), not to now. To refer to a time before another past time, we typically use the past perfect. Please take a look at our past perfect and talking about the past pages for more on this.

Best regards,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by adtyagrwl1 on Sat, 07/02/2015 - 13:45

Permalink
Hello Sir, If have been troubled by two sentences mentioned above. Please help here. Firstly, is the speaker talking about a past event here: "It was late, but they hadn’t arrived yet." Secondly, please clarify what the speaker meant in this sentence: "She won’t have sent the email yet." Thank you!

Hello adtyagrwl1,

'Yet' means 'not (so far) at this time', but 'this time' can be a time in the present or the past; in the example you quote the time reference is past and it means they hadn't arrived at the moment of speaking (i.e. a past moment).

Your second sentence uses 'will' for prediction about the present. When we make a guess about the present we can use will. For example:

Where's Tom?

He's not home yet. He'll be stuck in a traffic jam, I expect.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Abomohab on Wed, 28/01/2015 - 20:48

Permalink
Thank you Admin: I have finished all the lessons, exercises related to "already.still,yet and no longer" but I have never find a lesson or an exercise discussed "no longer.....could you please show or describe it?

Hello Abomohab,

'no longer' is an adverbial that is used to express that an action or state has ended. It is usually used before the verb, e.g. 'I no longer work there' (here the main verb is 'work'). It's also possible to use a negative verb and 'any longer', e.g. 'I don't work there any longer'.

We're in the process of revising the Grammar Reference, and the new page is to include this information - thanks for your feedback.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by reol on Thu, 06/11/2014 - 11:08

Permalink
Hi, It's very hard to choose which one is suitable 'just or already'. Just, yet, still, already Question 3/5 I've (already)/(just) seen this film. Let's watch something else.

Submitted by Kirk on Thu, 06/11/2014 - 18:56

In reply to by reol

Permalink

Hi reol,

Really, both 'already' and 'just' are possible here, though 'already' is probably more common. With 'already', it means that you have seen the film before, at some unspecified time in the past. With 'just', it means that you have seen the film in the recent past, perhaps even just as recently as the same day. That seems unlikely in most context - this is why I suppose 'already' is the answer whoever wrote this question had in mind.

Best wishes,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by mahmoud solyman on Mon, 03/11/2014 - 23:41

Permalink
which is more correct to say when some one asked you about something and you are still thinking about it is it to say '' i still think '' or to say " i am still thinking "

Hello mahmoud solyman,

The continuous form ('I am still thinking') is correct in this case as it shows you are in the process of thinking at the moment of speaking. The simple form ('I still think') would suggest a more general habit - something you do frequently rather than just at this moment.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Gaja1412 on Sun, 26/10/2014 - 11:13

Permalink
Hello! In the exercise "Adverbials - still, already, yet" I do not unterstand the position of "already" in the last sentence: "Have you finished that book already? (...)." I thought already is either in front of the main verb or after a form of "be". Is the position at the end of the clause used to accentuate "already"?

Submitted by Peter M. on Sun, 26/10/2014 - 21:49

In reply to by Gaja1412

Permalink

Hello Gaja,

The position of some words in English is quite flexible, and this is an example of that. We can say:

Have you already finished that book?

or

Have you finished that book already?

I wouldn't say that either of these particularly emphasises 'already'; pronunciation (stress and intonation) would be much more important for this.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by vanviethp on Fri, 18/04/2014 - 10:06

Permalink
Good afternoon Admins I am testing my English myself by doing Grammar Excercise. But I find a problem in this section. I think it is a technical issue. It can be discribed like below: After finishing excercise of Already, still, yet, I want to return to page 4 of Gramma Excercise by clicking on return button on the computer's screen. But it turn to page 1, not to page 4. Therefore I have to click on Next button to move to page 2, then page 3, page 4. It take a lot of time. Please resolve it as soon as possible. Thank you very much.

Hello vanviethp,

When you say "page 4", do you mean the already, yet, still and no longer page? That's what I understand, but I'm not sure if that's what you mean. If that's what you mean, why don't you just move up the page to see the explanation again? If you want to repeat the exercise, you can press the Reset button.

I would also suggest using the navigation menu on the top right of the page. There you can move between the different sections and pages of the English Grammar section more efficiently than by using your browser's buttons.

Please let us know if this doesn't help you.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by Lkea (not verified) on Tue, 18/03/2014 - 21:04

Permalink
Hello. Could you tell me what "perfective aspect" means?

Submitted by Peter M. on Wed, 19/03/2014 - 09:22

In reply to by Lkea (not verified)

Permalink

Hello Lkea,

Perfective refers to one of the three main characteristics which we use to describe different English verb forms:

  • time or tense (past, present, future)
  • aspect (simple, continuous, perfective)
  • voice (active, passive)

You can find out more about the perfective, as well as some practice exercises, on this page.  You might also find it useful to look at different perfective forms: the present perfect, the past perfect and the future perfect.

I hope that helps to clarify it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by danhuyenphan on Tue, 18/03/2014 - 05:39

Permalink
Hi Dear, I have a little trouble with "yet". According our site, "yet" comes at the end of the sentence, but I've read somethings like: I'm not yet born, or I am not a girl, not yet a woman. Can you tell me why? I think that "yet" only comes at the end of the sentence in the present perfect tense. But I'm not sure.

Submitted by Peter M. on Tue, 18/03/2014 - 22:01

In reply to by danhuyenphan

Permalink

Hi danhuyenphan,

The most common position for 'yet' is at the end of the sentence and this is a good rule of thumb, but other positions are possible if we want to change the emphasis in the sentence, including with the present perfect:

I haven't been there yet.

I haven't yet been there.

I hope this clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish

Submitted by bambang pamungkas on Fri, 07/02/2014 - 01:45

Permalink
i just start learning english

Hello bambang pamungkas,

Welcome to LearnEnglish - you've found a great resource for learning English! I'd suggest that you look at all the different sections of the site and then just start working on whatever pages you find useful.

And whenever you have a question, please let us know.

Best wishes,

Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Submitted by farya on Sun, 05/01/2014 - 14:11

Permalink

jakce killed her mother because her mother did not like she married with gardner...........this sentences is true?

 

Hello farya,

I'm afraid I'm not sure that if I understand your question correctly.  Are you asking if the sentence is correct (grammatically, for example)?  Or are you asking if it makes sense logically, or if the information in it is true?  Could you clarify please?

I also have one more request.  It's important that comments are made on the appropriate page so that we can see why you are asking your question and so that the comments can be seen by other users who are learning similar things as you.  This page is about 'already, still, yet and no longer', none of which are in your sentence, so please repost the question on a relevant page, making it a little clearer when you do.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team