The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

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Comments

Hi sir,
They were fond of music,played on various kinds of instruments,and indulged in much singing.
Tell me is it a clause "played on various kinds of instruments" and if it is so what kind of clause it is?

Hello aseel aftab,

I have already answered this question on another page. Please ask questions once only. We answer as quickly as we can and asking the same question multiple times only slows our work down.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Which phrase is correct
1. How about to see a movie tonight?
2. How about seeing a movie tonight?
and can you explain why?

Thanks.

Hello Saikendo,

The second sentence is correct. After 'How about...' we use either a gerund or a noun, not an infinitive.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

'She insisted that Jane sat there'.

Is it correct to use past simple (sat) here instead of the subjunctive? If it is, which one is more common?

Thank you.

Hello JakiGeh,

Both 'sat' and 'sit' are possible here, but have different meanings. 'sit' describes the command given to Jane, whereas 'sat' describes what happened. In Spanish, 'sit' would be 'que Jane se sentase' and 'sat' would be 'que Jane estuvo sentada'.

Does that make sense?

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi sirs,

Is it same meaning of 'An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin WHICH IS worth almost £200,000'?

Hi johnnyhey,

Yes, that is correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

Is this sentence correct?

''Peter is as intelligent a boy as Paul.''

I found it in my textbook when learning the equative case. I had never seen anything such before. I guess it is not used often, right?

Thank you in advance.

Hello MCWSL,

I can't comment on what your textbook says, but can confirm that this is a relatively unusual structure, though certainly something you could read or hear. 'a boy' tells us more about what the adjective 'intelligent' is qualifying.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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